Agricultural Science

AGSC 605 Statistics in Agricultural Research (3 credits) - UMES
I
nstructor: J. Harter-Dennis
 
This course will cover the principles of statistics and their application to agricultural research. Emphasis is placed on techniques and application of statistical and experimental design, data acquisition, analyses, interpretation and presentation as applied to agricultural sciences.
 
AGSC 691 Research Methodology in the Agricultural Sciences ( 3 credits) - UMES
Students will learn the basic principles of research methodology. Emphasis will be placed on techniques used in identifying problems, forming hypotheses, constructing and using data-gathering instruments, designing research studies, and employing statistical procedures to analyze data.

Animal Science

ANSC 453 Animal Welfare and Bioethics (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ANSC 101 and ANSC 103 or BSCI 106 or permission of instructor.
Ethical concerns related to the use of animals in modern society. Historical and philosophical overview of animal welfare and bioethics. Applied ethical discussions on human/animal interrelationships, physical and genetic manipulation, and other current issues associated with the treatment of animals used in food production, research, zoos, and as pets. 

ANSC 460 Comparative Vertebrate Immunology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ANSC 212, BSCI 201 or BSCI 440

Basic concepts in immunology, and comparing immunity in different vertebrates, including organization of immune systems, innate and adaptive immune responses. Special attention will be paid to how cell-mediated and humoral immune responses are induced in natural infections, and what are the effector mechanisms in both of these processes. Immune response in representative disease models such as infections with viruses and bacteria, cancer, and autoimmune disease will be discussed.

NSC 617 Quantitative Techniques in Physiology and Nutrition (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: MATH 220 or permission of department
evelopment and evaluation of quantitative techniques to explore mechanisms of physiological and nutritional regulation. Kinetic and dynamic models will be emphasized.

ANSC 627 Molecular and Quantitative Genetics (3 credits) - UMCP
lassical, molecular, and population genetics with specific emphasis on animal systems will be covered. Also, molecular approaches for manipulating genetics at the whole animal level (transgenic and cloning). Other model organisms will be discussed to provide a conceptual framework.

Anthropology

ANTH 422 Human-Plant-(Human and Bioactive PLant) Interaction (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ANTH220 and ANTH 320 or permission of department
This seminar course will discuss the evolutionary, historical, cultural, and ecological aspects of coevolution with respect to human and their interactions with specific bioactive plants. Case studies of yuma-plant-(pathogen) interactions will be discussed as well as an inclusive survey of anthropologically important phytochemicals. The seminar incorporates human-plant-(pathogen) interactions into models of human evolution and ecology.

ANTH 425 Theory and Practice of Applied Biological Anthropology (3 credits) - UMCP
An introduction to the major theoretical and methodological underpinnings of applied biological anthropology within such areas as anthropological genetics, applied anthropology, forensic anthropology, museum studies, and zoological parks. Emphasis is on the evaluation of the contributions of applied bioanthropological studies to particular problems in human health, environments, and heritage. 

ANTH 446 Chesapeake Archeology ( 3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ANTH 240
An overview of the culture and history of the Chesapeake watershed region, and of the issues that archaeologists face working in this region.

ANTH 630 Quantification and Statistics in Applied Anthropology (3 credits) - UMCP
An intensive overview of key quantitative and statistical approaches used by social scientists in applied policy research. This includes nonparametric and parametric statistical approaches. Student will utilize statistical software and analyze existing and student-created databases.

ANTH 450 Theory and Practice of Environmental Anthropology (3 credits ) - UMCP
An overview of contemporary application of cultural theory and methods to environmental problems. Topics include the use of theories of culture, cognitive approaches, discourse analysis, and political ecology. Case studies from anthropology, other social sciences, humanities, conservation, and environmental history are used.to demonstrate the applied value of a cultural-environmental approach. Also offered as ANTH 650; credit granted only for ANTH 450 or ANTH 650.

ANTH 646 Advanced Studies in Chesapeake Archaeology (3 credits) - UMCP
An understanding of the greater Chesapeake region, including its major cities, derived from prehistoric and historical archaeology. The course will include topics related to the past and present conditions of Native peoples, colonized populations, and the relationship of preserved remains to modern political standings.

ANTH 650 Advanced Studies in Theory and Practice of Environmental Anthropology (3 credits ) - UMCP
An overview of contemporary application of cultural theory and methods to environmental problems. Topics include the use of theories of culture, cognitive approaches, discourse analysis, and political ecology. Case studies from anthropology, other social sciences, humanities, conservation, and environmental history are used.to demonstrate the applied value of a cultural-environmental approach. Also offered as ANTH 450; credit granted only for ANTH 450 or ANTH 650.

Atmoshperic & Oceanic Science

AOSC 400 Physical Meteorology of the Atmosphere (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: MATH 141, PHYS 161,  or PHYS 171 or permission of department
The application of basic classical physics, chemistry, and mathematics to the study of the atmosphere. Composition of the atmosphere; energy sources and sinks (radiation in the atmosphere, radiative balance and radiative forcing of atmospheric processes); atmospheric thermodynamics; clouds and precipitation physics; atmospheric electricity and optics; mesoscale processes; airmass boundaries; severe weather; tropical cyclones; storms; global circulation.

AOSC 424 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in PHYS 171, PHYS 161 or MATH 141 or permission of instructor
Many of the properties of the atmosphere, ocean, and land surface are most easily observed from satellite remote sensing. This course will provide students with a hands-on introduction to a variety of passive and active sensing techniques and sensors observing our changing environment. Topics include: orbital dynamics and electromagnetic properties of the atmosphere and surface; atmospheric emission characteristics and scattering; chemical composition and spectroscopy; temperature retrievals; detection and retrieval of aerosol, cloud and rain; ocean surface properties; sea surface temperature and color; active sensing of wind stress, sea level and internal waves; time-dependent gravity; properties of vegetation and ice.

AOSC 610 Dynamics of the Atmospphere and Ocean I (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: MATH 462 or equivalent partial differential equations course
Equations of motion and their approximation, scale analysis for the atmosphere and the ocean. Conservation properties. Fluid motion in the atmosphere and oceans. Circulation and vorticity, geostrophic motion and the gradient wind balance. Turbulence and Ekman Layers. 

AOSC 611 Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean II (3 credits) - UMCP
Waves and instabilities in the atmosphere and the ocean. Gravity, Rossby, coastal and equatorial waves. Flow over topography. Dynamic instabilities including barotropic, baroclinic, inertial, and instabilities of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Stationary waves and multiple equilibria. 

AOSC 614 Atmospheric Modeling, Data Assimilation and Predictability (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: AOSC 610 or permission of instructor
Solid foundation for atmospheric and oceanic modeling and numerical weather prediction: numerical methods for partial differential equations, an introduction to physical parameterizations, modern data assimilation, and predictability. 

AOSC 616 Advanced Methods in Data Assimilation for the Earth Sciences (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: AOSC 614 or permission of instructor
An overview of the most important methods of data assimilation. Theory, techniques and strategies of these methods, as well as their possible drawbacks. Hands-on experimentation with variational and other data assimilation systems.

AOSC 630 Statistical Methods in Meteorology and Oceanography (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: STAT 400 or equivalent introductory statistics course
Parametric and non-parametric tests; time series analysis and filtering; wavelets. Multiple regression and screening; neural networks. Empirical orthogonal functions and teleconnections. Statistical weather and climate prediction, including MOS, constructed analogs. Ensemble forecasting and verification. 

AOSC 652 Analysis Methods in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: PHYS 141 and MATH 241 or permission of department
A variety of the analysis methods used by atmospheric and oceanic scientists will be applied to observational data sets such as Vostok ice core record, temperature trends, and satellite measurements of ozone, sea ice, etc. in a hands-on computer laboratory setting. Students will be exposed to Fortran, IDL, and Matlab as well a modern file formats such as HDF and netCDF.

AOSC 658 Special Topics in Meteorology (1-3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Various special topics in meteorology are given intensive study. The topic of concentration varies, from semester to semester and depends on student and faculty interests. Often, specialists from other institutions are invited to the campus on a visiting lectureship basis to conduct the course. 

AOSC 670 Physical Oceanography (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisites: permission of department
Ocean observations. Water masses, sources of deep water. Mass, heat, and salt transport, geochemical tracers. Western boundary currents, maintenance of the thermocline. Coastal and estuarine processes. Surface waves and tides. Ocean climate. 

AOSC 675 Carbon Cycle and Climate: Past, Present, and Future (3 credits) - UMCP
The fundamentals of the earth's carbon cycle, a key biogeochemical cycle that controls earth's climate and life. The changing characteristics of the carbon cycle on several timescales, ranging from geological, inter annual, and the more recent anthropogenic influences on carbon cycle and climate. The carbon cycle in the atmosphere, land, ocean, and the biosphere. The underlying human activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation that are responsible for the increase in the atmosphere CO2 and our future options in dealing with the carbon problem such as alternative energy and carbon sequestration.



 

Agricultural & Resource Economics

AREC 453 Natural Resources and Public Policy (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ECON 326 or ECON 306 or equivalent with permission of department
Rational use and reuse of natural resources. Theory, methodology, and policies concerned with the allocation of natural resources among alternative uses. Optimum state of conservation, market failure, safe minimum standard, and cost-benefit analysis. 

AREC 455 The Economics of Land Use (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ECON 326 or ECON 306 or equivalent with permission of department
Fundamentals of location theory. Microeconomics of land use decisions, including determination of rent and hedonic pricing models. Impacts of government decisions on land use, including regulation, incentives, provision of public services, and infrastructure investments. Impacts of land use on environmental quality, including issues relating to sprawl, agricultural land preservation, and other topics of special interest. 

Biochemistry

BCHM 461 Biochemistry I (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in CHEM 271 and CHEM 272 or in CHEM 276 and CHEM 277.
First semester of a comprehensive introduction to modern biochemistry. Structure,  chemical properties, and function of proteins and enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Basic enzyme kinetics and catalytic mechanisms. 

BCHM 462 Biochemistry II (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in BCHM 461. 
A continuation of BCHM 461. Metabolic pathways and metabolic regulation, energy transduction in biological systems, enzyme catalytic mechanism.

BCHM 463 Biochemistry of Physiology (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: grade of C- or better in CHEM 271 and CHEM 272 or iin CHEM 276 and CHEM 277
one-semester introduction to general biochemistry. A study of protein structure, enzyme catalysis, metabolism, and metabolic regulation with respect to their relationship to physiology. 

BCHM 465 Biochemistry III (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BCHM 461 or BCHM 463.  
An advanced course in biochemistry. Biochemical approach to cellular information processing. DNA and RNA structure. DNA replication, transcription, and repair. Translation of mRNA to make proteins.

BCHM 671 Protein Chemistry and Enzyme Catalysis (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BCHM 461 or equivalent with departmental permission

Principles of protein structure, folding, and function, experimental characterization of structure, active sites, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics. 

Behavior, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics

BEES 608 Seminar in Behavior, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics (1 - 4 credits) - UMCP
One seminar per week for each subject.

BEES 609 Special Topics in Behavior, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics (1 - 6 credits) - UMCP
Lectures, experimental courses and other special instructions in topics appropriate for in Behavior, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics (BEES) students.

BEES 708 Advanced Topics in Behavior, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics (1 - 4 credits) - UMCP
Lectures, experimental courses and other special instructions in various behavior, ecology, evolution and systematics subjects.
 

Biology

BIOL 430 Biological Chemistry (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisites: BIOL 141, 142 and CHEM 352
An introductory course describing the essential principles of biochemistry. Topics include the structure and characterization of biological macromolecules, the energetics and thermodynamics of coupled biological reactions and enzymology. The most important metabolic pathways are described, emphasizing their cellular compartmentalization, integration and control.
Fall semesters. 

BIOL 600 Ethics in Scientific Research (2 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: completion of at least one year of graduate study
Issues of scientific integrity with emphasis on investigators in the laboratory sciences, including mentoring, scientific record keeping, authorship and peer review, ownership of data, use of animals and humans in research, and conflict of interest.
 
 BIOL 600 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (4 credits) - UMES
Prerequisites: introductory biology, botany or zoology course and ecology
 Instructor: M. Mitra
Discussion topics include marine environments, adaptations of populations, structure of marine ecosystems, dispersion of marine organisms, migration, nutrition cycles, productivity and catches of fish, food chains and models of the sea.
 
BIOL 601 Environmental Microbiology (4 credits) - UMES
Prerequisite: general microbiology
Instructor: J. Pitula
Topics include microbial ecology of plants and animals, aquatic microbial ecology, soil microbial ecology, biodegradation, microbial insecticides, gastrointestinal microbiology, microbiology of foods and management of environmental problems.

BIOL 605 Advanced Topics in Comparative Animal Physiology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: consent of instructor
This course takes a comparative approach to the study of how various selective pressures have resulted in the evolution of specific solutions to physiological problems. These solutions are viewed within the context of the fundamental limitations to biological evolution that are set by the physical and chemical properties of matter.

BIOL 609 Special Problems in Zoology (1-6 credits) - UMCP
One seminar per week for each subject selected: A-Cell Biology; B-Developmental Biology; C-Estuarine and Marine Biology; D-Genetics; E-Parasitology; F-Physiology; G-Systematics and Evolutionary Biology; I-Behavior; J-General; K-Endocrinology; L-Ecology. 

BIOL 611 Bacterial Physiology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 or consent of instructor.
The combined approaches of bacterial genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry are applied to the study of bacterial physiological processes. An emphasis is placed on examining adaptation strategies used by bacteria upon encountering alterations of environment. Topics include mechanisms of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control, regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, biosynthesis, energy transduction, signal transduction systems and bacterial development.

BIOL 614 Eukaryotic Genetics and Molecular Biology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 or consent of instructor.
Genetics and molecular biology of lower and higher eukaryotes and their viruses. The course will focus on the maintenance and expression of genetic material as it relates to cell growth and development. It will cover current topics in the molecular genetics of several lower and higher eukaryotes at an advanced level, including mechanisms of genetic control that operate at the level of DNA replication, transcription and translation.

BIOL 615 Developmental Genetics (3 credits) - UMCP
 
Prerequisite: courses in molecular genetics and developmental biology or cell biology or permission of instructor.
 
Differential gene function and its regulation in developing systems. Genes and the analysis of developmental processes.

BIOL 620 Cell Biology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 230/BSCI 330/ZOOL 211 or BCHM 461; BSCI 222 and CHEM 233 or permission of  instructor.
Instructor: Ma
Offered with laboratory as BSCI 421. Molecular basis of cell structure and function in eukaryotes.

BIOL 620 Advanced Topics in Cell Biology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 303 and/or consent of instructor
A course designed to acquaint graduate students with contemporary problems of structure and function at the cellular level through a critical examination of the current literature. The course will include lecture material and presentations by students of oral and written reports on selected topics.

BIOL 622 Membrane Transport Phenomena (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: M. Colombini

Prerequisite: MATH 220 and (BSCI 330 or BSCI 230) or permission of instructor.
The fundamental phenomena related to solute movement in bulk solution and across interfaces. Examination of natural and artificial membrane transport systems, with emphasis placed on their mechanism of action.

BIOL 626 Approaches to Molecular Biology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 or consent of instructor
This course will focus on the molecular biology of eukaryotic cells and will include such topics as the sequence organization of DNA and genes, chromosome structure, messenger RNA synthesis and processing, messenger RNA translation and the regulation of the expression of genetic information.

BIOL 628 Computer Applications in Molecular Biology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 302 and BIOL 303
This course is designed as an introduction for biology and biochemistry students to the use of applications software in the analysis of DNA, RNA and protein sequence data. The course will be taught in a lab/lecture format. Topics will include operating systems; telecommunications with off-campus databases and specific software packages for general and analytical treatment of DNA, RNA and protein sequence data. Some elementary programming will be included.

BIOL 634 Microbial Molecular Genetics (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 or consent of instructor
The approaches of microbial genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry are combined for the study of the molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression in bacteria. Emphasis is placed on critical reading of research literature. Application of the combined approaches of microbial genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry to the study of fundamental biological processes will be demonstrated.

BIOL 641 Comparative Physiology (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: one year of biology and one year of organic chemistry, and one semester of physiology.
 
Cellular and biochemical processes used by animals to interact with both the external and cellular environment. Water balance, intermediary metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, anaerobic metabolism, thermal regulation, nerve and muscle physiology in cells from a broad variety of animal species are considered. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
 
BIOL 651 Physical Chemistry for Biologists (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BIOL 230 or equivalent
Mechanistic and quantitative aspects of chemical and physical processes, including diffusion, ligand-receptor binding, DNA melting, sedimentation, redox reactions, kinetics, fluorescence, osmosis and electrophoresis.

BIOL 653 Physiological Bases of Behavior (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 305 or consent of instructor
Studies of behavioral patterns and their physiological beset. The course begins with an extensive review of the fundamentals of neurobiology and basic principles pf animal behavior; followed by neurophysiological analyses of specific invertebrate behaviors such as locomotion, feeding, prey capture and predator evasion and learning.

BIOL 656 Plant Molecular Biology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 or consent of instructor
Following a brief review of some important principles and techniques in molecular biology, this course will pursuer in depth such topics as the cloning and characterization of chloroplast, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in plants, interactions of the nuclear and chloroplast gene products, genetic engineering of the nitrogen fixation genes, DNA plant viruses and the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid.

BIOL 657 Physiology of Marine and Estuarine Animals (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 305
A study of the physiological specializations demanded by marine/estuarine environments, including physiological mechanisms for coping with stresses imposed by extremes of temperature, salinity, aerial exposure and low oxygen concentrations; sensory physiology, including visual, chemical and mechanical modalities; exogenous and endogenous rhythms related to tidal or diel cycles and bioluminescence.

BIOL 660 Theoretical Population and Community Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP
 
Prerequisite: one year of college calculus and BSCI 462 or equivalent with permission of department.
 
Application of simple dynamic systems and optimization models to understand the dynamics of populations and ecological communities; population growth, predator-prey interactions, competition, food webs, foraging theory, and evolution of life histories. Instruction and use of the program Mathematica.
 
BIOL 661 Community Ecology (4 credits) - UMES
Instructor: D. Ruby
This course is an in-depth study of the biology of communities with emphasis on factors that regulate abundance, diversity and stability of communities. Current theories on community dynamics will be combined with field experiences and detailed analyses of selected field projects.

BIOL 662 Concepts in Animal Ecology (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 462 or equivalent with permission of department.
A graduate-level treatment of ecological processes and their evolutionary implications. Review of classical and contemporary literature, with emphasis on current developments in ecological theories, and their testing in the laboratory and in the field. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion/recitation per week.
 
BIOL 662 Population Biology (4 credits) - UMES
Instructor: D. Ruby
This course is an in-depth study of the biology of populations with emphasis on population structure, factors that regulate populations, and the effect of individual behavior on population characteristics. Field studies and computer simulations will explore selected areas of study.

BIOL 663 Theoretical and Quantitative Biology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 301 and BIOL 309
Mathematical, statistical and computer techniques used in quantitative analysis of biological phenomena. Topics will include the theoretical basis of commonly used uni-variate tests, as well as multi-variate techniques, such as discriminant, canonical factor and cluster analysis. Applications of methods will be discussed. Data sets will be assigned for analysis.

BIOL 665 Behavioral Ecology (4 credits) - UMCP
 
Prerequisite: one course in ecology and one course in behavior, or permission of instructor. 
 
Use of evolutionary theory to study life history and social behavior in animals and humans. Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. 

BIOL 666 Population and Quantitative Genetics (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: STAT 350, BIOL 142 and BIOL 309 or consent of instructor
The emphasis in this course will be the study in natural populations of characters whose variation is controlled by multiple genes. The foundations in Mendelian and population genetics will be described, followed by a comprehensive treatment of the field of quantitative genetics and then by a discussion of the place of quantitative genetics in behavioral genetics, physiological ecology and in population biology in general.

BIOL 667 Mathematical Biology (4 credits) - UMCP
 
Mathematical methods of analyzing deterministic and stochastic biological processes from a variety of areas (including population and evolutionary biology, neurobiology, physiology and morphogenesis). Qualitative aspects of dynamical systems which are usually given as difference or differential equations. The computer program Mathematica will be used to obtain the numerical solutions of these equations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIOL 680 Animal Behavior (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 142 or equivalent, STAT 350 or equivalent
This course explores the general themes and important questions in animal behavior. We cover subjects that examine how and why animals interact in the way they do with each other and with their environment. Topics will include the genetics of behavior, behavioral development, learning, animal communication, habitat selection, foraging, sexual selection, and mating systems.

BIOL 683 Genes to Genomes (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 142
This is a combined lecture, paper discussion and hands-on computing course comprising four majors sections that study applications of evolutionary theory to the exploration and analysis of phenotypic and biological sequence data. We begin by building a sound conceptual basis for the theory of evolution, including an introduction to population genetics. Real biological sequence data is then introduced and used to illustrate and extend this theory. From here, the focus shifts to some major branches of current evolutionary research. During the last part of the course, students give presentations on a research topic in evolution of their choice.

BIOL 685 Problems in Vertebrate Evolution (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or consent of instructor
This course will provide a comprehensive survey treatment of the five vertebrate classes, emphasizing paleontological approaches, their morphological and behavioral adaptations and evolution in relation to climatic and geologic change. Both past and present vertebrate communities will be considered. The laboratory component of the course will stress structure and composition of past communities, species identification and biomechanics.

BIOL 686 Genome Sciences (4 credits) - UMBC
Genome science represents a convergence of classical biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology with the new discipline of bioinformatics into a new field. Advances in biomedical and agricultural research are developing the potential of genome science in both private and public sectors. Important questions that have been unapproachable are now though to be within reach. BIOL 686 provides students with the requisites for understanding genome science. It includes basic instruction in experimental functional genomics, and analytical bioinformatics. 

BIOL 688F Fish Physiology (3 credits) - UMES
This course is designed to provide an overview of fish physiology which fishery biologists and others can supplement with readings in current texts, reviews and research articles. Applicable points of general and comparative physiology are also included. Summaries of important anatomic considerations are included where relevant, but this course is primarily for those who have already completed courses in general physiology, chemistry, biochemistry, and fish anatomy.
 
BIOL 688J Fishery Biology and Management (3 credits) - UMES
Instructor: E. May

BIOL 695 Seminar in Bioinformatics (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
This course will introduce basic and advanced computational issues and methods used in computational biology. Topics will include algorithms for alignment of biological sequences, multiple sequence alignment, and gene prediction.
 
BIOL 701 Teaching Biology (1 credit) - UMCP
Introduction to instructional methods and strategies, University and College policies, and campus resources for new CMNS graduate teaching assistants.
 
BIOL 704 Cell Biology from a Biophysical Perspective (3 credits) - UMCP
Recommended: BSCI 330, PHYS 121 and PHYS 122
 
Instructor: S. Sukharev
An approach to cell biology by focusing on mechanisms and underlying paradigms. It will not assume a great deal of factual biological knowledge, but will expect a background that prepares students to think quantitatively and mechanistically.

BIOL 708 Advanced Topics in Biology (1-4 credits) - UMCP
Lectures, experimental courses and other special instructions in various zoological subjects. 
 
BIOL 709 Selected Advanced Topics in Biology (1-4 credits) - UMCP
Lectures, experimental courses and other special instructions in various biological subjects.

BIOL 737 Research Seminar in Bioinformatics (1 credit) - UMBC
this course is based on critical discussion of current literature and ongoing research. Students are required to make seminar presentations on their work and on important new developments in these research areas.

BIOL 739 Research Seminar in Molecular Biology (1 credit) - UMBC
Students and faculty will present results of their recent experiments and/or important papers from current literature for critical discussion.

BIOL 754 Research Seminar in Animal Physiology and Behavior (1 credits) - UMBC
Critical discussion of current literature and ongoing research.

BIOL 755 Research Seminar in Cellular Neurobiology and Behavior (1 credit) - UMBC
This is a research and literature review seminar course in the area of cellular neurobiology.

BIOL 759 Research Seminar in Plant Biology (1 credit) - UMBC
Students and faculty will present results of their recent experiments and/or important papers from current literature for critical discussion.
 
 BIOL 760 Plant Population Biology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 472 or permission of instructor
An examination of current theoretical and empirical research covering topics such as demography, reproductive strategy, clonality, seed banks, interspecific competition and plant-herbivore interactions.

BIOL 762 Physiological Plant Ecology (2 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 460, or equivalent with permission of department
Environmental effects on plant ecophysiology. Microclimatology, leaf energy balance, plant responses to temperature and radiation, physiological adaptations, water relations and plant gas exchange. 

BIOL 765 Sociobiology (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: a course in behavior and permission of instructor
Deals with the description and analysis of animal social organizations, the adaptive nature of animal societies, the effects of early experience, and the role of communication in the integration of animal groups. Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

BIOL 767 Behavioral Endocrinology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 342 or BSCI 447
The interactive effects of hormones and behavior. Emphasis on the reproductive and stress hormones as they affect the brain and behavior.

BIOL 769 Research Seminar in Evolution and Ecology (1 credit) - UMBC
Students and faculty will present results of their recent experiments and/or important papers from current literature for critical discussion.

BIOL 770 Graduate Seminar in Molecular Biology (3 credits) - UMBC
The class will consist of a series of student led seminars related to a specific topic in molecular biology.

BIOM 601 Biostatistics I (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BIOM 301, STAT 464 or equivalent
Estimation and hypothesis testing, t tests, one and two way analysis of variance, regression, analysis of frequency data. Lecture will emphasize uses and limitations of these methods in biology, while the laboratory will emphasize the use of statistical analysis software for the analysis of biological data. 

BIOM 602 Biostatistics II (4 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: B. Momen
Prerequisite: BIOM 405 or BIOM 601
The principles of experimental design and analysis of variance and covariance.

BIOM 603 Biostatistics III (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BIOM 602 or equivalent
Applications and implementation of linear model analysis to biological data, including multivariate regression model, mixed model, generalized linear mixed model, nonlinear logistic and Poisson regression models, power calculation and survival analysis. 

BIOM 621 Applied Multivariate Statistics (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Momen
Prerequisite: BIOM 602
Brief review of matrix algebra, means covariance matrices, multivariate normal, multivariate confidence ellipses. MANOVA, Discriminant Methods, Principal Component Analysis, Factor Analysis, Cluster Analysis, Multidimensional Scaling, and other topics depending on student interest.
Fall semester.  Course offered on IVN.

BMGT 830 Operations Research: Linear Programming (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: Math 240 or equivalent with permission of department.
Concepts and applications of linear programming models, theoretical development of the simplex algorithm, and primal-dual problems and theory. 

BSCI 410 Molecular Genetics (3 credits) - UMCP

Prerequisite: BSCI 222 and CHEM 233 or (CHEM 231 and CHEM 232)
An advance genetics course emphasizing the molecular basis of gene structure and function in the context of modern approaches to the genetics of humans and model organisms.

BSCI 411 Bioinformatics and Integrated Genomics (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BSCI 222. Recommended: BSCI 410
Computational methods for the study of biological sequence date in comparative biology and evolution. Analysis of genome content and organization. Database searching, pairwise and multiple and multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic methods, pattern recognition and functional inference. Functional and comparative genomic approaches.

BSCI 412 Microbial Genetics (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 223 and BSCI 222. 

A laboratory/lecture based course that covers the fundamentals of mutation, mobile genetic elements and transmission genetics of microbial organisms using both classical and molecular approaches. 
Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

BSCI 417 Microbial Pathogenesis (3 credits) - UMCP

Prerequisite: BSCI 222 and BSCI 223.
Current research in microbial pathogenesis and the molecular and cellular basis of bacterial disease. Comprehensive overview of the molecular basis of pathogenesis with a focus on model microbial systems to illustrate mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Topics covered: how microorganisms attach to and enter cells; how host cells are damaged by microbial products; how the host responds to invasion; and host-pathogen evolution.

BSCI 420 Cell Biology Lectures (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 222, BSCI 330 and CHEM 233. 

Molecular and biochemical bases of cellular organization and function in eukaryotes.

BSCI 421 Cell Biology (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 330, BSCI 222 and CHEM 233. 

Molecular and biochemical basis of cellular organization and function in eukaryotes. 
Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.

BSCI 424 Pathogenic Microbiology (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 223. 
The role of bacteria and fungi in the diseases of humans with emphasis upon the differentiation and culture of microorganisms, types of disease, modes of disease transmission, prophylactic, therapeutic, and epidemiological aspects. 
Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.

BSCI 425 Epidemiology and Public Health (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 223. 
History, characteristic features of epidemiology; the important responsibilities of public health; vital statistics. Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion/recitation per week. 

BSCI 426 Membrane Biophysics (3 credits) - UMCP

Prerequisite: BSCI 330; and PHYS 122 or PHYS 142; and MATH 130 or MATH 140. 
Quantitative aspects of biology and the use of mathematical descriptions of biological phenomena. The focus will be on membrane structure, transport, and bioenergetics.

BSCI 430 Developmental Biology (3 credits) - UMCP

Prerequisite: BSCI 222 and BSCI 330 

Structural, functional and regulatory events and mechanisms that operate during development to produce an integrated, multicellular organism composed of a multitude of differentiated cell types.

BSCI 434 Mammalian Histology (4 credits) - UMCP 
Prerequisite: BSCI 330 and BSCI 440 or permission of department. 
A study of the microscopic anatomy, ultrastructure and histophysiology of tissues and organs of mammals. 
Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. 

BSCI 437 General Virology (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 222 or permission of department.

Discussion of the physical and chemical nature of viruses, virus cultivation and assay methods, virus replication, viral diseases with emphasis on the oncogenic viruses, viral genetics, and characteristics of the major virus groups.

BSCI 442 Plant Physiology (4 credits) - UMCP 
Prerequisite: BSCI 105 and CHEM 233 or (CHEM 231 and CHEM 232). 

A survey of the general physiological activities of plants. 
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BSCI 443 Microbial Physiology (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in BSCI 223 and (BCHM 461 or BCHM 463). 
Microbial cellular and population growth. Fermentation metabolism, physiology of anaerobiosis, and energy conservation and transformation in bacterial membranes. Efficiency of energy utilization for growth. Membrane structure and transport. Bacterial chemotaxis. Regulation of bacterial chromosome replication, RNA and protein synthesis. Control of metabolic pathways.

BSCI 451 Physical Chemistry for Biologists (3 credits) - UMCP

Prerequisite: BSCI 330. 
Mechanistic and quantitative aspects of chemical and physical processes, including diffusion, ligand-receptor binding, DNA melting, sedimentation, redox reactions, kinetics, fluorescence, osmosis, and electrophoresis.

BSCI 460 Plant Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 106. 
Course Description: The dynamics of populations as affected by environmental factors with special emphasis on the structure and composition of natural plant communities, both terrestrial and aquatic.

BSCI 461 Plant Ecology Laboratory (2 credits) - UMCP 
Pre- or corequisite: BSCI 460. 
Course Description: The application of field and experimental methods to the qualitative and quantitative study of vegetation and ecosystems. 
Three hours of laboratory per week. 
Two or three field trips per semester.

BSCI 462 Population Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisites: BSCI 106 and MATH 130. 
Theory of population growth and regulation, life tables, and theory of competition and predation, evolution in ecological settings, community structure and dynamics.

BSCI 463 Laboratory and Field Ecology (2 credits) - UMCP 

Pre- or co-requisite: BSCI 462 and a course in statistics

Laboratory and field exercises involving problems of contemporary ecological interest; population density regulation, community structure, and spatial pattern diversity in both terrestrial and aquatic systems.

BSCI 464 Microbial Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 223; and CHEM 241 and (CHEM 242 or CHEM 243). 
Interaction of microorganisms with the environment, other microorganisms and with higher organisms. Roles of microorganisms in the biosphere. Microorganisms and current environmental problems.

BSCI 465 Behavioral Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 106 and BSCI 222. 
How natural and social environments shape individual behavior. The influence of evolution on patterns of individual adaptation. Use of the evolutionary paradigm to investigate specific problems in animal and human behavior.

BSCI 467 Freshwater Biology (4 credits) - UMCP 
Prerequisite: permission of department. 
Biology and ecology of freshwater invertebrates in lotic and lentic habitats, their adaptation to aquatic life, their function in aquatic ecosystems, and their relationship to environmental deterioration. Laboratory will include field trips, demonstrations, and identifications. 
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. 

BSCI 471 Molecular Evolution (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 222 or permission of department. 
Patterns of DNA sequence variation within and between species, caused by nucleotide changes and the movement of transposable elements. Theories of molecular evolution, such as the neutral theory. Molecular clock' hypothesis: its importance as a practical empirical tool in molecular genetics and systematics and its theoretical foundation.

BSCI 472 Evolutionary Biology of Plants (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 106 and BSCI 222. 
Evolution in plant populations. The pace, pattern, and mechanisms of evolution will be discussed within a genetic and ecological framework. Some emphasis will be placed on processes that are unique to the evolution of plants.

BSCI 473 Marine Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 207. Courses in evolution and animal behavior are strongly recommended.
A detailed analysis of the evolutionary ecology of marine invertebrates; emphasis on testing of theories and on current literature.

BSCI 474 Mathematical Biology (4 credits) - UMCP 
Prerequisite: MATH 220 and MATH 221 or (MATH 131 and MATH 130). 
Mathematical methods for analyzing deterministic and stochastic biological processes from a variety of areas (including population and evolutionary biology, neurobiology, physiology and morphogenesis). Qualitative aspects of dynamical systems which are usually given as difference or differential equations. The computer program Mathematica will be used to obtain the numerical solutions of these equations. 
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. 

BSCI 485 Protozoology (4 credits) - UMCP 
Prerequisite: One year of biology. 
Basic conceptual treatment of free-living and parasitic protozoan functional morphology, life history, and systematics. The laboratory will stress observations of protozoa, living and stained, collected from diverse habits. 


BSCI 494 Animal-Plant Interactions (3 credits) - UMCP 

Prerequisite: BSCI 106 and or permission of department). 

Theoretical, conceptual and applied aspects of the ecological interactions between plants and animals.

BTEC 650 Applied Biochemistry (3 credits) - UMBC
This course will review the chemistry of living systems, with an emphasis on topics of biotechnological and biomedical interest.

BTEC 651 Molecular and Cell Biology (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BTEC 650 or equilvalent course in biochemistry
This course explores the molecular basis of cell structure, organization and function.

BTEC 652 Molecualr Biotechnology (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BTEC 651 or consent of instructor
A lecture-, discussion- and project-based course that focuses on the molecular and genetic tools used to analyze and modify genetic material and to modify organisms to produce desires small molecules and proteins.

BTEC 660 Regulatory Issues in Biotechnology (3 credits) - UMBC
This course provides a comprehensive coverage of all steps involved with the regulatory approval process for a biotechnology-derived product. 
 

CBMG 688 Special Topics in Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics (1 - 4 credits) - UMCP
Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects in the topics of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics.

CBMG 789 Seminar in Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics (2 credits) - UMCP

CLFS 610 Natural Products Chemistry (3 credits)
Prerequisite: permission of department
Foundations of natural products chemistry; how nature goes about making (biosynthesizing) these compounds and elements of enzymology and genomics relevant to production of these compounds; relevance of natural products chemistry as a driving force for drug discovery and innovation in biotechnology.

CLFS 620 Modern Molecular Genetics (3 credits)
An overview of genetics including the genetic basis/components in prevalent diseases, genetically engineered organisms and foods, the importance of knowing the complete DNA sequence of organisms.

CLFS 630 Principles of Transmission Genetics: a Historical and Modern Perspective (3 credits)
Examines the origins of modern genetics, model genetic systems, and the role of chromosomes in vertical transmission of genetic information from parent to offspring. Classical gene mapping, population genetics and the various applications of modern genetics will also be studied.

CLFS 660 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology (3 credits)
Application of ecological and evolutionary principles to assess the impact of the human species on the environment and its inhabitants. Specific case studies are included to illustrate problems of biodiversity loss and actions required to reverse the trends. 

CLFS 665 Ecology and Global Change (3 credits)
Ecological concepts across scale ranging from the individual, to populations, communities, ecosystems, and landscapes will be presented. Global change issues will encompass alteration of atmospheric trace gases, biogeochemistry cycles, land use changes, and introduction of non-native species to new habitats.

CLFS 680 Chemical Ecology (3 credits)
An examinations of the utilization of organic aural products by plants and animals for various life processes. Examples will include how materials are utilized for sexual selection, defense against predators, sexual attractants, and as natural herbicides and repellants.

CLFS 690 Biochemistry (3 credits)
An advanced overview of general biochemistry including a study of protein structure and their physical properties; how these properties relate to catalysis, regulation and metabolic chemistry with respect to their relationship to physiological conditions.

CLFS 710 Experimental Biology (6 credits)
Participants develop skills in four areas of biological research while investigating a variety of biological systems. Those areas include: 1) iterative scientific methods, 2) basic laboratory techniques, 3) experimental design and analysis, 4) critical evaluation of published research.

CHEM 401 Principles of Physical Chemistry I (4 credits) - UMES
Instructor: Dr. Yan Waguespack
Prerequisite: CHEM 112, PHYS 161, PHYS 262 or PHYS 181H, PHYS 182H, MATH 211 (physics or mathematics may be taken concurrently) or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics with emphasis on their application to chemical systems. Topics covered include: thermochemistry, equation of state, physical and chemical equilibrium and electrochemistry. Three hours lecture and a three hours laboratory per week. Laboratory Fee: $25.00 

CHEM 402 Principles of Physical Chemistry II (4 credits) - UMES
Instructor: Dr. Yan Waguespack
Prerequisite: CHEM 401
Continuation of CHEM 401. Molecular structure and bonding, interpretation of spectra, elementary quantum and statistical mechanics, kinetic, theory of gases, chemical kinetics and the theory of rate processes.
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Laboratory Fee: $25.00 

CHEM 420 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 credits) - UMES
Instructor: Dr. Yan Waguespack
Prerequisite: CHEM 112, CHEM 114, CHEM 212, CHEM 214 or permission of the instructor.
This course builds upon introductory courses that cover elementary principles of chemical bonding and structure, thermodynamics, kinetics and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Three hours lecture and three hours of laboratory session per week. Laboratory Fee: $25.00. 

CHEM 422M Bio-Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits) - UMES
Instructor: Dr. Yan Waguespack
Prerequisite: CHEM 212, CHEM214, CHEM 314, BIOL 326 or permission of the instructor.
This course deals with the functions of all metallic elements in biology. Consequently the roles of metal ions and a variety of non-metals in crucial life processes willbe discussed. The course, which is interdisciplinary in nature, is intended for pre-medical biology and chemistry majors and those who aspire to become researchers in the bio-medical field. It will also serve the needs of final year undergraduates in inorganic chemistry, as coordination chemistry will be emphasized.

CHEM 437 Comprehensive Biochemistry I (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and CHEM 352 or equivalent
The first semester of a two-semester sequence providing a through introduction to the principles of modern biochemistry. Major topics include enzyme kinetics and the structures and properties of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids.
Fall semester. 

CHEM 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: CHEM 481
An advanced study of the compounds of carbon, with special emphasis on molecular orbital theory and organic reaction mechanisms.
 
CHEM 450 Ethics in Science and Engineering (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of department
Ethical issues in science and their resolutions. Topics will be ethics and scientific truth, ethics and other scientists, and ethics and society.

CHEM 474 Environmental Chemistry (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: CHEM 481 or equivalent
The sources of various elements and chemical reactions between them in the atmosphere and hydrosphere are treated. Causes and biological effects of air and water pollution by certain elements are discussed. 

CHEM 606 Bioinorganic Chemistry (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: CHEM 405 or consent of instructor.
The functions of metlas in biology, biochemistry and medicine are presented with emphasis on the structural and catalytic properties of metal centers in metalloproteins. Topics include catalysis, metalloenzyme mechanisms, inorganic co-factors and co-enzymes, and metal chemotherapeutic agents.
 
CHEM 621 Advanced Environmental Chemistry (4 credits) - UMES
Prerequisite: One year of general chemistry, one semester of organic chemistry and one semester of analytical chemistry, or permission of instructor. 
Instructor: M. Cheney
The origin, transport and effects of atmospheric and aquatic pollutants are studied, with emphasis on energy-related pollutants including coal, oil and synfuels.
 
CHEM 622 Bioinorganic Chemistry ( 3 credits) - UMES
Instructor: Y. Waguespack
This course deals with the functions of metallic elements in biology. These functions range from simple structural roles to much more complex roles when they transfer electrons and break bonds. The roles of metal ions and a variety of non-metals in crucial life processes will be discussed. This course will also examine the physical methods and techniques, used in this field. In-depth discussions will also cover metalloenzymes and metal complexes used as imaging agents.

CHEM 631 Chemistry of Proteins (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: BIOL 430, CHEM 137 or equivalent and consent of instructor
An advanced treatment of the chemistry of proteins and protein-containing supramolecular structures. Topics include isolation and purification of proteins, structure of proteins and relation of structure to biological function.

CHEM 632 Advanced Biochemistry (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: consent of instructor 
The topics presented would not normally be covered in any other biochemical courses and may include an advanced treatment of enzyme kinetics, with emphasis upon two substrate systems; allosteric control mechanisms; replication and transcription and the biochemistry of specialized tissue. 

CHEM 632 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 credits) - UMES
Students will acquire the latest knowledge and expertise in the utilization of modern analytical instrumentation routinely used in research laboratories, namely multidimensional NMR and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. This course will provide an in-depth study of reaction mechanisms of the most fundamental reaction in organic synthesis, namely the different ALDOL reactions. 

CHEM 633 Biochemistry of Nucleic Acids (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: CHEM 437 or equivalent or consent of instructor
A survey of nucleic acid structure and function with emphasis on chemical aspects. Topics will include DNA and RNA structure, packaging of nucleic acids, chemical and physical properties of nucleic acids, proteins and enzymes of DNA replication, fidelity of nucleic acid synthesis, biochemistry of DNA recombination, enzymology of transcription and RNA processing.

CHEM 651 Mechanisms of Organic Reactions (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequiste: CHEM 352
Advance treatment of he study of organic reaction mechanisms, with emphasis on the development of broad principles governing various organic reactions. Description of metastable intermediates, such as carbonic ions, cab anions, carbenes and free radicals; kinetic effects in relation to structure; conformational analysis; and stereochemistry.
 
CHEM 670 Advanced Biochemistry (3 credits) - UMES
Prerequisites: one semester of biochemistry
Instructor: A. Nyame
Course covers the classification, chemistry and metabolism of protein, amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids.

CHEM 678 Special Topics in Environmental Chemistry (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: CHEM 474
In-depth treatment of environmental chemistry problem areas of current research interest. Topics will vary.
  
 
 

CMSC 460 Computational Methods (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: CMSC 106, MATH 240 and MATH 241 or permission of department.
Basic computational methods for interpolation, least squares, approximation, numerical quadrature, numerical solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, systems of linear equations and initial value problems for ordinary differential equations. Emphasis on methods and their computational properties rather than their analytic aspects. Intended primarily for students in the physical and engineering sciences. 

CMSC 466 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: CMSC 106, MATH 240 and MATH 241 or permission of department.
Floating point computations, direct methods for linear systems, interpolation, solution of nonlinear equations. 

CMPS 618 Introduction to Earth System Science (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of department
A graduate seminar to introduce students go interdisciplinary concepts of earth system science. Interactions among the atmosphere, oceans, biosphere, solid earth and humans.

CMPS 628 Problems in Earth System Science (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: CMPS 618 or permission of department
A graduate seminar focusing on methods to study the earth system. Interdisciplinary focus on research studying interactions among the atmosphere, oceans, biosphere, solid earth and humans.

CONS 608 Seminar in Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology (1 - 4 credits) - UMCP
Special topics and current literature in conservation biology and sustainable development.

CONS 670 Conservation Biology (3 credits)
Instructor: K. Gedan
Conservation in the Anthropocene means conserving biodiversity and ecosystem function in the midst of climate change, habitat loss, overexploitation, altered nutrient cycling, and invasive species with protected areas and reserve networks, ecosystem restoration and other biodiversity conservation and management schemes.
Cross-listed as MEES670. Fall semesters. On IVN.

CONS 680 Problem Solving in Conservation/Development (4 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: K. Lips

Students will be exposed to current problems in conservation and development through great lectures, field trips, interviews and appropriate literature. Working in teams, students will formulate recommendations based on a synthesis of biological, economic and policy considerations.

ECON 637 Economics of Natural Resources (3 credits) - UMBC
This course examines the role of economics in developing policy toward the use and management of natural resources. The theory of optimal management of resources is explored, including applications to both renewable resources such as wind energy and ayer resources and non-renewable resources such as fossil fuels. Current and alternative policy options toward resources use are explored. Other topics include the impotence of ownership rights over resources and tradeoffs between current and future generations in the use of resources.

ENCE 432 Ground Water Hydrology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ENCE 305 and permission of department
Concepts related to the development of the ground water resources, hydrology, hydrodynamics of flow through porous media, hydraulics of wells and basin-wide ground water development. Fundamentals of ground water pollution are introduced.

ENCE 610 Environmental Chemistry (3 credits) - UMBC
This course presents chemical principles in the context of aquatic systems such as rivers, oceans, wetlands and the sub-surface environment. Equilibrium and kinetic concepts are reinforced through the use of chemical equilibrium and kinetic models. Surface and colloid chemistry are also discussed. At the end of the course, the student will be able to understand the basic chemical phenomena that control the fate of pollutants in the environment.

ENCE 612 Environmental Physico-chemical Processes (3 credits) - UMBC
This course focuses on physic-chemical processes that control the fate of contaminants in engineered and natural systems. Physico-chemical phenomenon is first introduce from a phenomenal standpoint, then its role in both engineered and natural systems is discussed. 

ENCE 614 Environmental Biological Processes (3 credits) - UMBC
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the fundamental and design aspects of biological processes. The course focuses on engineered biological treatment for both municipal wastewater systems and contaminated soils and sediments. An understanding of biological treatment operations requires knowledge in the fundamental areas of biochemistry, mass transport, microbiology, reaction kinetics and reactor engineering.

ENCE 621 Groundwater Hydrology (3 credits) - UMBC

Instructor: C. Welty
Learning objectives for this course: (1) to understand the use and occurrence of groundwater in the US; (2) be able to quantify flow of groundwater in aquifers and unsaturated soils; (3) design and evaluate laboratory tests to determine porous media parameters; (4) design and evaluate field tests to determine aquifer parameters; (5) understand the physical basis and its relationship to mathematical modeling of contaminant transport in aquifers. 

ENCE 627 Environmental Modeling (3 credits) - UMBC
This course covers the fundamental theories and techniques of modeling environmental processes, which is applicable to many disciplines of science and engineering. Students learn to identify key features of the environments and their ecological, biological and physic-chemical properties, represent the features mechanistically, identify their associated processes, derive governing equations for the processes and solve the equations.

ENCE 629 Physical Hydrology (3 credits) - UMBC
This course provides and introduction to quantifying the components of the hydrologic cycle - precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, infiltration, runoff, stream flow and groundwater flow. Emphasis is on quantifying flow and storage in watersheds, including temporal and spatial patterns. Appropriate field and laboratory tests used to measure hydrologic processes and mechanistic and statistical models for data evaluation and interpretation are presented.

ENCE 630 Environmental and Water Resource Systems I (3 credits) - UMCP
Application of statistical and systems engineering techniques in the analysis of information necessary for the design or characterization of environmental or hydrologic processes; emphasis on the fundamental considerations that control the design of information collection programs, data interpretation, and the evolution of simulation models used to support the decision-making process. 

 

ENCE 635 Geographic Information Systems for Watershed Analysis (3 credits) - UMCP
Emphasis is on the use of GIS to support the analysis and modeling tasks associated with watershed planning and management. This course familiarizes the student with fundamentals of GIS data models, projections, and coordinate systems. Students develop a set of GIS-based algorithms solving common engineering problems in hydrology. Internet data sources and GPS technology are also covered. 

ENCE 637 Biological Principles of Environmental Engineering (3 credits) - UMCP
An examination of biological principles directly affecting man and his environment, with particular emphasis on microbiological interactions in environmental engineering related to air, water and land systems; microbiology and biochemistry of aerobic and anaerobic treatment processes for aqueous wastes. 

ENCE 646 Environmental Fate and Transport of Contaminants (3 credits) - UMBC
This course covers basic principles of chemical fate and transport in the environment. Course material includes the fundamental concepts and practical, quantitative problem-solving techniques dealing with environmental contaminations. Mass balance; chemical equilibria and kinetics; environmental transport; and advanced topics such as groundwater well dynamics and subsurface fate and transport, atmospheric transport of pollutants and Monod kinetics are among those included. Computer software is used to solve complex but practical fate and transport problems in the environment.

ENCE 650 Process Dynamics in Environmental Systems (3 credits) - UMCP
The fundamentals of heterogeneous equilibria, rates of environmental reactions, and flow and material transport are presented. Applications of these principles will be presented to small and large scale environmental problems involving liquid, gas, and solid phases. Both natural and engineered environmental systems will be examined.

ENCE 651 Chemistry of Natural Waters (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: A. Torrents
Application of principles from chemical thermodynamics and kinetics to the study and interpretation of the chemical composition of natural waters is rationalized by considering metal ion solubility controls, pH, carbonate equilibria, adsorption reactions, redox reactions and the kinetics of oxygenated reactions which occur in natural water environments. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

ENCE 655 Environmental Behavior of Organic Pollutants (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ENCE 651
Instructor: A. Torrents
Introduction to the scientific data needed and methods currently available to assess the environmental risk of organic chemicals. Applications of principles from chemical thermodynamics will be used to study phase-transfer processes of organic pollutants in the environment (solid/water, solid/air, water/air). Physical-chemical properties of organic pollutants will be used to estimate partitioning.

ENCE 658 Modeling and Spatial Statistics with Applications in the Urban Environment (3 credits) - UMBC
The goal of this course is to provide students with knowledge of mathematical models for the urban environment from various disciplinary perspectives, and how such models might be coupled to address urban water problems. Simple models from the fields of environmental contaminant transport, economics, and ecology will be used as examples. Material covered will include time series analysis and geostatistical analysis of spatially distributed data in the physical, biological, and social sciences. The course will highlight challenges of the interdisciplinary perspective including (1) space and time scales of concern to different disciplines; (2) issues with uncertainty in data and models; and (3) examples of models that are available to the different disciplines.

ENCE 660 Air Pollution (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisites: CHEM 101, CHEM 102 or equivalent, MATH 225
The objective of this course will be to provide an introduction to the sources, chemistry and fate of airborne pollutants. In general, it will be broken into three parts: sources and dispersion processes, gas-phase chemistry and particulate-phase chemistry. The focus will be on the urban atmosphere, but as some pollutants have impacts well beyond their sources region some discussion of the global cycles will be appropriate. 

ENCE 688B Hydrology, Climate & Water Resources (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: K. Brubaker
Prerequisite: Basic probability and statistics; permission of instructor
A detailed examination of the physical processes controlling water availability; the global hydrologic cycle and regional hydroclimate; deterministic mathematical models for process simulation; global water resource issues.

ENCE 688D Numerical Modeling for Water Resources & Environmental Engineering (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: K. Brubaker
Prerequisite: graduate-level course work in one of the following: hydrology, hydraulics,or environmental chemistry; permission of department and instructor.
Rigorous introduction to the development and use of numerical models for water resources applications.

ENCE 730 Environmental and Water Resouce Systems II (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ENCE 630 or permission of instructor
Advanced topics in operational research. Applications to complex environmental and water resources systems. The use of systems simulation and probabalistic modeling.

ENCE 755 Transformations of Organic Compounds in the Environment (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Focuses on reaction kinetics and mechanisms of organic pollutants transformations. Kinetic principles will be used to calculate or estimate the pollutants' half-lives. Physical-chemical properties of organic pollutants will be used to estimate transformation mechanisms and rates. Emphasis is on developing an understanding of how physio-chemical and structural properties relate with the transformation of organic pollutants.

ENCE 756 Bioremediation (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Introduction to microbiological and engineering fundamentals of bioremediation. Coverage will emphasize current and emerging technologies for major classes of environmental contaminants and contaminated site characteristics; relevant microbial ecology, biochemistry and physiology; site data needed to assess the feasibility of the bioremediation option; design and operation of engineered bioremediation systems, including reactor and in situ approaches; monitoring methods for evaluation the success of bioremediation projects; technical evaluation of selected case studies.
 

ENME 640 Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: MATH 462 or equivalent or permission of department.
Equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, vorticity and energy in fluid flows. Low Reynolds number flows. Boundary layers. The equations are illustrated by analyzing a number of simple flows. Emphasis on physical understanding to facilitate the study of advanced topics in fluid mechanics. 

ENME 641 Viscous Flow (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ENME 640 or permission of department.
Fluid flows where viscous effects play a significant role. Examples of steady and unsteady flows with exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. Boundary layer theory. Stability of laminar flows and their transition to turbulence. 

ENME 642 Hydrodynamics I (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: ENME 640 or permission of department
Exposition of classical and current methods used in analysis of inviscid, incompressible flows. 

ENST 410 Ecosystem Services: An Integrated Analysis (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 361 or permission of instructor
The importance of our ecosystem and the services they provide will be discussed. Basic principles used to analyze ecosystem services will be discussed and applied using case studies and filed exercises. Forestland, wetlands and our marine resources are increasingly recognized for their ecosystem services provided to society, to include clean air and water, wildlife habitat, biodiversity, carbon storage and pollination services. This course will prepare students to deal with the complex issues involved in understanding those and other ecosystem services and their importance to society and environmental sustainability. Students will analyze the ecological, political and financial dimensions of enhancing, restoring and sustaining ecosystem services. New and on-going government programs and private business ventures will be discussed.

ENST 417 Soil Physics and Hydrology (3 credits) - UMCP
 
Instructor: R. Hill
Prerequisite: ENST 200 and MATH 133 or MATH 115 or permission of instructor.
 
A study of soil-water interactions, the hydrologic cycle, the unique properties of water and soil, the soil components and their interactions, the field water cycle, transport processes involving water, heat and solutes, human effects on soil and groundwater, as well as the measurement, prediction, and control of the physical processes taking place in and through the soil.

ENST 422 Soil Microbial Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: S. Yarwood
Prerequisite: ENST 200 or one course in biochemistry or microbiology
The interdisciplinary study of soil microorganisms and their interactions with the mineral matrix, resulting in processes such as nutrient cycling, decontamination, and natural product production. Focus on the diversity of soil communities, their survival strategies, and the new strategies used to study these communities. Cross-listed as ENST 622; credit only granted for one course.
 
ENST 423 Soil-Water Pollution (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: R. Hill
Prerequisite: CHEM 104 and ENST 200 and permission of department
Reaction and fate of pesticides, agricultural fertilizers, industrial and animal wastes in soil and water with emphasis on their relation to the environment.

ENST 427 Nonpoint Source Pollution Assessment Techniques (3 credits) - UMCP
 
Instructor: G. Felton
 
Prerequisite: one course in hydrology or permission of department
 
Various techniques to measure non-point source pollution, quantify mass transport, and statistically evaluate water quality criteria. Primary focus is on agriculture and water but urban NPS pollution is addressed.  
 
ENST 434 Toxic Contaminants: Sources, Fate, and Effects (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: L. Yonkos
Prerequisite: ENST 333 and ENST 334
Study of the release to the environment, transport through natural compartments, persistence and ultimate fate of various classes of contaminants produced as a result of human activities. Topics will culminate in discussions of impacts to wildlife and human health.
 
ENST 436 Emerging Environmental Threats (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: P. Leisnham
Prerequisites: ENST 233 or permission of department
Course Description: Examine new and potential environmental concerns in the air, water, soil, space, and the build environment. Emphasis on studying the intrinsic links between ecosystem and human health. Topics will include climate change, resource consumption, biodiversity change, infectious disease, non-traditional pollutants, and other complex and significant environmental concerns.
 
ENST 447 Biodiversity, Ecology, and Human Health (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: P. Leisnham
Prerequisite: BIOM 301 or permission of department
An investigation of how biodiversity and ecological processes affect human health. We will view humans as integral but unique members of ecosystems whose well-being depends on a range of complex ecological services. Topics will include human-induced environmental changes, species invasions, species interactions, medicines from nature, and infectious diseases. Lab will involve conducting research on native and introduced species of medical importance.

ENST 451 Water Quality: Field and Lab Analysis Methods (3 credits) - UMCP
 
Instructor: A. Baldwin
 
Prerequisite: CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 and CHEM 104 or CHEM 231 andCHEM 232. 
 
Hands-on experience with techniques for assessing physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of surface waters, including streams, lakes, and wetlands. Emphasis is placed on understanding effects of water quality on ecosystem structure and function. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

ENST 445 Ecoligical Risk Assessment (3 credits)  - UMCP
Instructor: W. Hillwalker
Prerequisite: ENST 330, BSCI 361 and BIOM 301 or permission of department
Assessment of ecological impacts of perturbations on natural systems. Course will describe quantitative methods of estimating environmental impacts by extrapolating from laboratory and field data. The role of regulatory agencies and implications of scientific uncertainty on risk management ail be covered.
 
ENST 460 Principles of Wildlife Management (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: J. Murrow
Prerequisite: 2 semesters of biology laboratory or permission of department
Ecological principles and requirements of wildlife as basis for management, and introduction to the scientific literature. Conflicts in wildlife management, government administration of wildlife resources, legislation, and history of the wildlife management profession.
 
ENST 461 Urban Wildlife Management (3credits) - UMCP
Instructor: J. Murrow
Ecology and management of wildlife in urban areas. Planning, design, and wildlife conservation in landscape ecology. Public attitudes, preferences, and values; review of private conservation organizations.

ENST 462 Field Techniques in Wildlife Management (2 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: J. Murrow
Hands-on experience with field techniques in wildlife management focusing on various methods of conducting indices, estimates, and censuses of wildlife populations. Includes capture and handling of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals by use of drift fences, cover boards, mist nets, box traps, and dart guns.
 
ENST 479 Tropical Ecology and Resources Management (1 - 6 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: P. Kangas
Prerequisite: BSCI 106 and introductory economics and permission of instructor
Tropical ecosystems and issues of human use and impact. Includes lectures which lead up to an off-campus trip in a tropical environment.

ENST 605 Energy and Environment (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: D. Tilley
Prerequisite: MATH 220 or equivalent
The role of energy in environmental and human-dominated systems and their linkages. Discussion of the historical and modern production and consumption of energy; energy systems simulation modeling, energy analysis and energy auditing.  Cross-listed as ENST 405 and MEES 605; credit only granted for one course.
 
ENST 622 Advanced Soil Microbial Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: S. Yarwood
Prerequisite: ENST 200 or 1 course in BCHM or 1 course in microbiology
The interdisciplinary study of soil microorganisms and their interactions with the mineral matrix, resulting in processes such as nutrient cycling, decontamination and natural product production. Focus on the diversity of soil communities, their survival strategies, and the new strategies used to study these communities. 
 
ENST 630 Advanced Wetland Soils (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: M. Rabenhorst
Prerequisite: ENST 200
The soils of wetlands including hydrology, biogeochemistry, and pedogenesis, including a focused discussion of current literature. Federal and regional guidelines for wetland soils are covered with an emphasis on validating interpretations through field observations.

ENST 643 Advanced Industrial Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: P. Kangas
Prerequisite: BSCI 361 or permission of department
Problems of waste management and recycling in human societies are covered. The industrial ecology approach to design is contrasted with analogous patterns from natural ecosystems.

ENST 647 Advanced Biodiversity, Ecology, and Human Health (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: P. Leisnham
Prerequisite: BSCI 361 or permission of department
An investigation of how biodiversity and ecological processes affect human health. Topics will include human-induced environmental changes, species invasions, species interactions, medicines from nature and infectious diseases. Students will lead class discussion of peer-reviewed literature and complete an assignment writing a research grant proposal. Lab will involved researching native and introduced species of medical importance.
 
ENST 650 Advanced Wetland Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: A. Baldwin
Prerequisite: BIOM 301 or permission of department
Plant and animal communities, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem properties of wetland systems. Laboratory emphasizes collection and analysis of field data on wetland vegetation, soil and hydrology. Cross-listed as MEES 650. 
 
ENST 652 Advanced Wetland Creation and Restoration (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: A. Baldwin
Prerequisite: BSCI 106, BSCI 362 and ENST450/650 or MEES650, or permission of department 
Design, construction and evaluation of wetlands restored or created for ecosystem enhancement or mitigation. Topics include ecological restoration theory, goal-setting, practices for establishing wetland hydrology, substrate, and vegetation, and restored ecosystem monitoring and functional assessment. Cross-listed as MEES 652.
 
ENST 681 Advanced Ecological Design (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: S. Lansing 
Prerequisite: One semester calculus, CHEM 131 and PHYS 121 or permission of instructor
An advanced survey course on the field of ecological design. Principles of design are illustrated with case studies from biologically-based waste treatment systems, ecosystem management and sustainable development. Cross-listed as MEES 681.

 
ENST 698W Current Issues in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: R. Harrell
Prerequisite: ENST 214, ENST 314 and/or ENST 460
A case-study analysis course with considerable student participation discussing current issues in fisheries and wildlife science that focus on critical analysis of the issue, steps taken to address the issues, and if the issue has been resolved.
 
ENST 702 Environmental Science and Technology : Communication and Professional Development (2 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Training in communication and professional development to prepare students to succeed in careers within the fields of environmental science and technology. Topics include manuscript and technical writing, job search, communication with academic and non-academic audiences, multi-disciplinary collaboration, management, professionalism, leadership, ethics, and career opportunities. Course emphasizes practical training through facilitated discussions and critique practicums.

ENST 722 Advanced Soil Chemistry (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
A continuation of ENST 421 with emphasis on soil chemistry of minor elements necessary for plant growth.

ENTM 612 Insect Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: a course in general ecology or permission of department.
An advanced course in population and community ecology, plant-insect interactions, and insect biogeography. Emphasis on current entomological literature. 

ENTM 667 Aquatic Entomology (3 credits) - UMCP
Biology, ecology, and taxonomy of aquatic insects in lotic and lentic habitats, their adaptation to aquatic life, their function in aquatic ecosystems, and their relationship to environmental deterioration.

ENTM 701 Effective Teaching: TA Training (1 credit) - UMCP
survey and discussion of topics pertinent to graduate students who are first-time teaching assistants, including teaching responsibilities and policies, effective techniques of lecturing and leading discussions, composing and grading quizzes and exams, cultural diversity, time management, and development of a teaching portfolio.

ENVS 603 Marine Ecotoxicology (3 credits) - UMES
Prerequisites: CHEM 112, CHEM 211, BIOL 112, MATH 210
Instructor: A. Ishaque
This course cuts across traditional subject boundaries by integrating different disciplines such as chemistry and biochemistry through ecology and statistics. It provides students with a distinct approach for solving marine environmental pollution issues stemming from stable pollutants and how they intersect with biotic and abiotic components of the marine ecosystem. 
 
ENVS 660 Earth Science (4 credits) - UMES
Prerequisites: one year and chemistry and one year of physics
Instructor: N. Chen
This is an interdisciplinary course designed to show how geology, meteorology, physical geography, soil science, astronomy and oceanography are interrelated in the study of earth and its environment in space. Spring semester.

EPIB 610 Foundations of Epidemiology (3 credits) - UMCP
Introduction to the discipline of epidemiology and its applications to health issues and practices. Basic epidemiological concepts and methods will be covered.

EPIB 650 Biostatistics I (3 credits) - UMCP
Basic statistical concepts and procedures for public health. Focuses on applications, hand-on experience, and interpretations of statistical findings.

EPIB 651 Biostatistics II (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: EPIB 650
Introduction to a variety of statistical tool with applications in public health, including one- and two-sample inference, nonparametric methods, categorical data, ANOVA, simple and multiple regression.
 

GEOG 431 Culture and Natural Resource Management (3 credits) - UMCP
asic issues concerning the natural history of humans from the perspective of the geographer. Basic components of selected behavioral and natural systems, their evolution and adaptation, and survival strategies.

EOG 445 Climatology (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: GEOG 345
uantitative nvestigations into the earth's radiation balance, water cycle, and the interrelationship of climate and vegetation. Methodologies in climate research. Case studies related to global climate change.

EOG 472 Remote Sensing: Digital Processing and Analysis (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: GEOG 372, GEOG 306 or equivalent
Digital image processing and analysis applied to satellite and aircraft land remote sensing data. Consideration is given to preprocessing steps including calibration and geo registration. Analysis methods include digital image exploration, feature extraction thematic classification, change detection, and biophysical characterization. 

GEOG 473 Geographic Information Systems and Spacial Analysis (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: GEOG 373 or GEOG 306 or equivalent
Analytical uses of geographic information systems; data models for building geographic data bases; types of geographic data and spatial problems; practical experience using advanced software for thematic domains such as terrain analysis, land suitability modeling, demographic analysis, and transportation studies. 

GEOG 606 Quantitative Spacial Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: GEOG 305 or permission of department.
Multivariate statistical method applications to spatial problems. Linear and non-linear correlation and regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis. Spatial statistics including: trend surfaces, sequences, point distributions. Applications orientation. 

GEOG 614 Human Dimensions of Global Change (3 credits)
he intersection of human and biophysical systems from the vantage point of the impact of human actions on the environment are examined. The impact of the biophysical environment on humans is also discussed.

GEOG 615 Land Cover and Land Use Change (3 credits)
Prerequisite: GEOG 442, GEOG 472, GEOG 435, or GEOG 473 or permission of department
An examination of land use cover and land use change science, addressing the causes, impacts and projection of change. Key concepts of land use science are presented and recent research papers and case studies are reviewed. 

GEOG 635 Population and Environment (3 credits)
ourse explores the reciprocal relationship between humans and physical systems that result in changes in the environment. Focuses on the roles of demographic variables of population growth and migration and physical environmental variables from both a historic and recent time frame. These processes will be examined at various scales, from local changes to global changes.

EOG 638 Seminar in Biogeography (3 credit)
Prerequisite: 6 credits of biogeography or ecology or permission of department
opics in biogeography: biological aspects of geography. These may include ecology, biodiversity, climate-vegetation interactions, impact of global change.

EOG 639 Seminar in Physical Geography (3 credits)
rerequisite: permission of department
xamination of selected themes and problems in physical geography.

GEOG 642 Ecosystem Processes and Human Habitability (3 credits)
rerequisite: GEOG 422 or permission of department
iological and biogeographical processes relevant to the capacity of the earth's biota to support the demands of its human populations.

EOG 673 GIS Modeling (3 credits)
rerequisite: GEOG 472 or permission of department
rocess modeling and spatial analysis within the GIS context. Introduces theoretical fundamentals and conceptual approaches to frame and represent geographical phenomena and spatial decision making.

EOG 695 Spatial Models (3 credits)
rerequisite: GEOG 605 and GEOG 483 or permission of department
athematical and other models for varied subject matter. Models for point, line, area, surface spatial data contexts. Descriptive and normative models. Aggregate and dis-aggregate models. Tools for research, planning, decision making. Information systems context. Intuitive understanding emphasized. Practical experience using several computer tools. 



GEOL 436 Principles of Biogeochemistry (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 220; GEOL 100 or GEOL 120, GEOL 322 and (CHEM 131 and CHEM 132) or (CHEM 135 and CHEM 136) or CHEM 103 or permission of instructor.
n introduction to the basic principles of biogeochemistry including aspects of organic geochemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, global geochemical cycles, the origin of life and paleoenvironmental evolution.

EOL 451 Groundwater (3 credits) - UMCP

Prerequisite: GEOL 110 and MATH 140 and (GEOL 120 or GEOL 100) and (CHEM 131 and CHEM 132) or (CHEM 135 and CHEM 136 or CHEM 103) or permission of the department
An introduction to the basic geologic parameters associated with the hydrologic cycle. Problems in the accumulation, distribution and movement of groundwater will be analyzed. 

GEOL 452 Watershed & Wetland Hydrology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of department
Physical processes by which water moves in watershed and wetland systems. Topics include: precipitation, infiltration, flow in the unsaturated zone, streamflow generation processes, and groundwater flow. 

EOL 453 Ecosystem Restoration (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: permission of instructor
verview of ecosystem functions across biomes/geologic settings, and considerations and tradeoffs in ecosystem restoration strategies. Specific case studies and discussions will be aimed at understanding how structure can influence biophysical and biogeochemical processes supporting ecosystems and then describes how rates, timing, and location of physical, chemical, and ecosystem processes can be altered by different restoration strategies to enhance ecosystem services.

GEOL 650 Isotope and Trace Element Geochemistry (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: GEOL 443 or permission of instructor
race elements and isotopes in geology, including modern applications in geochronology and petrogenesis.

GEOL 652 Advanced Watershed and Wetland Hydrology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: GEOL 452 or permission of department
Physical and chemical processes in watershed and wetland systems, with an emphasis on redox reactions. 

GEOL 654 Fluvial Geomorphology Seminar (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: permission of instructor
luvial geomorphology is the study of movement of water and sediment in stream channels. This includes: formation of channels, open channel hydraulics, sediment transport or bed load and suspended load, river morphology and landscape evolution.

GES 601 Introduction to Geography and Environmental Systems (3 credits) - UMBC
Instructor: Staff
Graduate-level introduction to the principles underlying geographic and environmental systems. Guiding theories of human geography, physical geography and environmental science will be introduced through detailed examination of cross-cutting multidisciplinary issues including natural hazards and human vulnerability, the management of water resources and fossil fuels, and global environmental changes..

GES 605 Applied Landscape Ecology (4 credits) - UMBC

Instructor: E. Ellis
Prerequisites: GEOG 305 and GEOG 386 or permission of instructor.
Course Description: Applies the tools of landscape ecology, including GIS, remote sensing, aerial photography and landscape classification, to explore the spatial patterning of ecological processes across landscapes at different scales.  Hands-on lab and field exercises will develop understanding and skills necessary for students to plan and conduct their own investigations of landscape patterns, process, and change in local and regional landscapes in collaboration with the instructor. Course includes 4 Saturday field trips.

GES 606 Aquatic Ecology (4 credits) - UMBC
Instructor: C. Swan
Students enrolled in this course will gain a thorough knowledge of the local aquatic biota and their habitats. Emphasis in this lab/field-based course will be placed on the interaction between physical, chemical and biological processes occurring in aquatic ecosystems. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, and interpret ecological information by working in teams to conduct a research project.

GES 608 Field Ecology (4 credits) - UMBC
Instructor: C. Swan
Students enrolled in this course will gain an appreciation for the modern scope of scientific inquiry in the field of ecology. A major goal is for the students to become familiar with how organisms interact with each other and their natural environment by understanding the structure and function of different types of local ecosystems. Students will learn field collection techniques, as well as how to organize, analyze, present and interpret ecological information. Lecture and laboratory.

GES 610 Atmospheric Science (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: calculus and college-level physics
This course provides a rigorous survey of advanced concepts in atmospheric science including: thermodynamics, radiative transfer, chemistry, cloud microphysics, dynamics, mid-latitude weather systems, boundary layer and climate processes. The emphasis is on developing a conceptual understanding of the various physical processes at work in the atmosphere and their linkage with other planetary systems such as the hydrosphere, cryosphere and biosphere. 

GES 611 Fluvial Geomorphology (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: introductory physics and calculus Preferred: prior coursework in geomorphology or hydrology
Instructor: A. Miller
This course focuses on watershed processes associated with the evolution of river systems and with sculpture of the earth's surface by running water. Topics covered include the principle of flow in river channels; erosion and sedimentation; dynamics of sediment transport; morphometry of drainage networks; depositional and erosional features associated with the development of river channels and floodplains; the geometry and statistical properties of channel cross-section, longitudinal profile and planform patterns; the dynamics of channel and floodplain response to environmental change; spatial and temporal variability of fluvial processes and landforms; and anthropogenic modification of the fluvial system.

GES 612 Biogeochemical Cycles and the Global Environment (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Instructor: E. Ellis
This course explores the chemistry and cycling of elements across the earth's surface and atmosphere, with special emphasis on human-induced changes in biogeochemistry that are driving global warming, ocean acidification, acid rain, ozone depletion, water pollution, and nutrient saturation of freshwater, estuarine and coastal environments. Basic biogeochemical processes will be introduced and then integrated to explain the global cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and sulfur and how these are changed by human activities. Students are required to design an original research project relating to their thesis or dissertation work.

GES 615 Climate Change (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: GES 601
Instructor: J. Halverson
This course will resent the historical evolution of the earth's atmosphere and its response as a dynamic system to both internal and external forcings, including anthropogenic influences. This will include examination of the unique manner in which earth's atmosphere evolved compared to other planetary atmospheres, and the linkages between climate and other earth spheres (biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere). The various timescales of climate change ranging from millions of years to decades will be discussed. Theories that involve changes in orbital parameters, solar output, plate tectonics, ocean thermocline circulations, planetary impactors, volcanic emissions, the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and human emissions of carbon dioxide will be investigated in detail. Students will gain insight into the workings of General Circulation Models (GCMs) and run their own climate simulations using the EdGCM model developed jointly between NASA and Columbia University. 

GES 616 Physical Hydrology (4 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: calculus, probability and statistics
Instructor: A. Miller
Provides an introduction to quantifying the components of the hydrologic cycle - precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, infiltration, runoff, stream flow, and groundwater flow. Emphasis is on quantifying flow and storage in watersheds, including temporal and spatial patterns. Appropriate field and laboratory tests used to measure hydrologic processes and mechanistic and statistical models for data evaluation and interpretation are presented.

GES 632 Seminar in the Natural Resources and Environment (3 credits) - UMBC
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to undertake advanced study of particular natural resource/environmental problems and conflicts. A major goal of this course is to map future resource landscapes through the systematic analysis of contemporary natural resources and environments. In recent years, this seminar has taken up such topics as world water resource supplies, global biodiversity, and conflicts over wilderness designation in the western United States.

GES 634 Wildlife Law and the Endangered Species Act (3 credits) - UMBC
Instructor: E. Parker
The 1973 Endangered Species Act is arguably the most controversial of U.S. environmental laws. The course combines science, policy and legal history, philosophy and contemporary politics in an integrative approach to understand and analyze the natural resource problem of threatened and endangered species in the U.S. The course covers the evolution of wildlife law from feudal Europe to the present, conflicts over state vs. federal powers, the emergence of wildlife and natural history literature, changing attitudes towards wildlife in the 20th century, and the concept of extinction.

GES 651 Seminar in Urban Sustainability (3 credits) - UMBC
Students will be exposed to cutting-edge literature in urban sustainability, and conduct an original research project integrating the concept of sustainability with human and physical geographies of urban places. Readings and in-class discussion will support the topical foci of student projects and develop students' research, writing, and presentation skills.

GES 661 Social Dimensions of Sustainability (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: GES 601
One of the greatest barriers to truly interdisciplinary human-environment research in recent years has been the lack of environmental research fully incorporating the rich theoretical literatures from human geography and other social sciences addressing social dynamics. However, a newly evolving body of sustainability literature grounded in existing literatures from the critical social sciences has begun to emerge. This cutting-edge body of theoretical works and empirical research attempts to elucidate the complex social processes driving environmental degradation, environmental change, and differential vulnerabilities through the lens of critical social theory. Students will be exposed to this cutting-edge literature in sustainability science, and will be required to critically engage it through in-class discussions and written assignments. Students will apply this literature to their own research through a formal written paper.

GES 662 Spatial Analysis of Coupled Human-Environmental Systems (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: GES 386 or 686
nstructor: R. Neff
his course will focus on the use of GIS in analyzing social and environmental systems that constitute complex human-environmental systems. Specific dimensions of environmental and social sustainability such as land use, transportation, economic development, environmental justice, etc., will then be explored in detail. Spatial analysis skills focused on environmental processes and social contexts will be developed through in-class exercises. These exercises and discussions are designed to enhance the students' understandings of the planning process and of the complexities of applying the concept of sustainability in the real world. The course will end with a student-defined research project. 

GES 681 Remote Sensing of Environment (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Instructor: J. Tang
This course is an introduction to image analysis and interpretation for mapping-monitoring the earth's surficial environments from multispectral satellite images. Lectures will cover theories and principles of remote sensing. Laboratory exercises will provide hands-on experience in the use of computers and software for image analysis, interpretation, and classification applied to multispectral satellite image data. Environmental applications include wetland delineation, forest mapping, land use land cover, and urban sprawl analysis.

GES 685 Field Research in Geography (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Instructor: E. Ellis
Students in this course gain hands-on experience with field methods for environmental measurement, mapping and spatial analysis of soils, vegetation and other biota, and land-cover and land-use in local landscapes assisted by GIS, GPS, remote sensing and other techniques. The class will meet one session each week and six full-day Saturday sessions; scheduling to be arranged. Students work in teams and prepare final projects that will be presented as scientific posters and on the web.

GES 686 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4 credits) - UMBC 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Instructor: J. Tang
This course covers the basic concepts and principles of Geographic Information Systems, data models, data structures, applications and technical issues. Lab will focus on how these basic principles are implemented in GIS. These include an entire sequence of building spatial databases: data capture, editing, adding attributes, building topology, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis available in a vector-based GIS.

GES 687 Advanced applications of Geographic Information Systems (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Instructor: J. Tang
This is an advanced GIS course covering advanced applications of Geographic Information Systems, and is intended for students who have already acquired an introductory knowledge of the field. The course places a strong emphasis on building hands-on skills as well as advanced theoretical knowledge in spatial analysis. The topics include the theory and methods based on prior knowledge, skills, and interests of students in the following areas: geospatial ontologies, spatial pattern analysis, advanced raster processing, spatial interpolation and geostatistics, database design and systems, dynamic GIS modeling, and computational geometry and mathematical techniques used in GIS.

GES 688 Seminar in Geography and Environmental Systems (1 credit) - UMBC
This is a seminar that may be offered by department faculty on any topic of special interest. Students will meet with the faculty member once each week to discuss key concepts and methods as presented in the scholarly literature.

 

 




 

GPLS 622 Intro to Biostatistics (3 credits) - UMB
This course is designed to develop an understanding of statistical principles and methods as applied to human health and disease. Topics include research design; descriptive statistics; probability; distribution  models; binomial, Poisson and normal distribution; sampling theory and statistical inference.

GPLS 635 Bacterial Genetics (4 credits) - UMB
Covers induction, expression and selection of mutants; molecular basis of mutations; transfer of genetic information by transformation, transduction and conjugation; complementation and recombination in phage and bacteria; plasmids; and recombinant DNA.

MATH 462 Partial Differential Equations (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: MATH 241 and MATH 246.
Linear spaces and operators, orthogonality, Sturm-Liouville problems and eigenfunction expansions for ordinary differential equations. Introduction to partial differential equations, including the heat equation, wave equation and Laplace's equation. Boundary value problems, initial value problems, and initial-boundary value problems. 

MATH 463 Complex Variables for Scientists and Engineers (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: MATH 241 or equivalent with permission of department.
The algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, mapping properties of the elementary functions. Cauchy integral formula. Theory of residues and application to evaluation of integrals. Conformal mapping. 

MATH 620 Algebraic Number Theory I (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: MATH 601.
Algebraic numbers and algebraic integers, algebraic number fields of finite degree, ideals and units, fundamental theorem of algebraic number theory, theory of residue classes, Minkowski's theorem on linear forms, class numbers, Dirichlet's theorem on units, relative algebraic number fields, decomposition group, inertia group and ramification group of prime ideals with respect to a relatively Galois extension. 

MIEH 600 Foundations of Environmental Health (3 credits) - UMCP
Overview of the chemical, physical and biological hazards present in our living and working environment and their effects on human health.

MIEH 710 Major Environmental Pollutants: Formation, Transport, Analysis and Effects (3 credits) - UMCP

MIEH 720 Principles of Toxicology (3 credits) - UMCP

MIEH 721 Physiological Toxicology ( 3 credits) - UMCP

MIEH 725 Environmental Analysis (3 credits) - UMCP
Fundamentals of environmental chemistry and in environmental media (water, air, soil) and in biota.
 

MEES 432/632 Physiological Ecology of Animals  (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Rowe
Prerequisite: BSCI 361 or equivalent of permission of instructor.
Course examines the influence of environmental constraints on animal function and energetic efficiency in the context of abiotic conditions in the habitats occupied by individuals. Offered as a 400-level or 600-level option.
Offered spring of odd years. IVN based.

MEES 604 Biometry (3 credits)
Instructor: R. Hilderbrand
Course emphasizes the analysis and design of experiments dealing with environmental sciences data and using the R programming language. Topics include descriptive statistics; graphical data exploration; hypothesis testing and inference using parametric tests relying heavily on ANOVA and regression and appropriate non-parametric counterparts; statistical power; and experimental design. An independent student project analyzing existing or newly collected data is required. 
Offered spring of odd years. IVN based.

MEES 605 Energy and Environment (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: D. Tilley
Prerequisite: MATH 140, MATH 220 or equivalent
Course covers the role of energy in environmental and human-dominated systems and their linkage. Discussion includes the historical and modern production and consumption of energy, energy systems simulation modeling, energy analysis and energy auditing; and a review of national energy policies and proposed alternatives. Cross-listed as ENST 405 and ENST 605, credit awarded for only one.

MEES 606 Cell and Molecular Biology: A Mechanics View (4 credits)
Instructor: R. Jagus, A. Place
Prerequisite: biochemistry and/or cell biology
An invisible world courses through every living thing. This is the world of molecules, tiny machines millions of times smaller than the machines we are most familiar with, like automobiles. Individually, each of the molecules is a delicate instrument, measuring, making, weighing, and building the thing we call life. The molecules of living things are unique among the molecules of the earth. These tiny molecular messengers, engines and machines are built to perform highly specific tasks unlike the molecules formed by physical processes. This course introduces these molecules, the forces they use, and how they assemble into machines of such precise function they can be the basis of life.
Offered in fall. IVN based.

 

MEES 607 Quantitative Methods in Environmental Sciences (3 credits)
Instructor: L. Sanford, T. MIller
Prerequisite: 1 semester of calculus
Explores mathematical approaches and solutions that cut across environmental disciplines, and it will introduce analytical techniques that are taught infrequently in other courses. The goal is to provide students with the tools and confidence they need to apply quantitative methods in their own research.
Offered in fall. IVN based.

MEES 608D Scientific Writing and Communication (1 credit)
Instructor: E. North
Prerequisite: permission of instructor - participants should have data that they can use in a draft scientific paper, or they should be ready to write a draft of their research proposal.
This seminar provides an introduction to writing scientific papers and conference abstracts, giving scientific talks and posters, and preparing resumes and seeking jobs. There will be exercises in writing and editing which can be focused on data collected as part of a participant's graduate research. Students will become critically aware of factors that lead to excellence in communicating about science.
Offered in fall. IVN based.

MEES 608I Algal Blooms: Causes, Consequences and Conjecture (2 credits)
Instructor: K. Sellner
Explores the reasons for phytoplankton blooms in coastal and oceanic waters, examining the roles of physics, bathymetry, water quality, and the ecology, physiology and behavior of phytoplankton species. Students are encouraged to have MEES 621 or equivalent course background.
Offered in spring of even years. IVN based.

MEES 608L Marine Microbial Ecology (2 credits)
Instructor: R. Hill, F. Chen
Seminar-style course in which current papers from the literature on marine microbial ecology will be presented by students and critically analyzed by the group. Molecular approaches will be emphasized.
Offered in spring of even years. IVN based.

MEES 608 Scientific Presentation (2 credits)
 
Instructor: K. Sowers
 
Weekly lectures emphasize skills required to effectively communicate scientific results and conclusions in venues ranging from professional meetings to job interviews. Students are required to prepare and present 3 15-minute presentations and 1 60-minute presentation on a topic of their choice. Grading is based on attendance, participation, genuine effort to improve presentation skills and overall effectiveness as a speaker at the completion of the course.
Offered at IMET.

MEES 608T Applications of State-of-the-Art Analytical Techniques in the Environmental Sciences (2 credits)
Instructor: J. Schijf
This course will provide a broad overview of current progress in the environmental sciences resulting from the development of new analytical technology or from novel applications of established technology. Methods to be discussed include approaches to quantifying the concentrations and speciation of nutrients, organic compounds, trace metals, and stable isotopes in a variety of natural samples, as well as some biomolecular and toxicological essays.
Offered in spring of even-numbered years. IVN based.

MEES 608X Advanced Topics in Aquatic Ecology (1 credit)
Instructor: R. Morgan
In-depth seminar course on an advanced topic in contemporary stream ecology
Offered in spring of odd years. IVN based.

MEES 610 Land Margins Interactions (4 credits)
Instructors: T. Fisher, M. Castro, L. Harris
Overview course on physical, chemical and biological interactions in coastal zone for incoming graduate students. The course emphasizes water flows, biogeochemistry, biological productivity, and anthropogenic effects and covers interactions between the atmosphere, watersheds, streams and estuaries. 4 hours of lecture per week, a term paper, 3 field trips, and mid-term and final exams.
Offered in fall. IVN based.

MEES 611 Estuarine Systems Ecology (3 credits)
Instructor: W. M. Kemp
Prerequisites: general ecology; advanced calculus; computer literacy (some programming skills).
Provides graduate students with an integrated view of estuarine ecosystem processes and modeling methods for simulation and analysis of these processes. Organized into three parts presented in parallel: 1) introduction to estuarine ecology; 2) introduction to numerical modeling; 3) student model development. 
IVN based.

MEES 614 Landscape Ecology (4 credits)
Instructor: M. Fitzpatrick
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
Development and effects of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, the role of disturbance in ecosystems, and the characteristic spatial and temporal scales of ecological events. A variety of concepts important in landscape ecology, including: the structure and function of landscapes; identifying and modeling landscape pattern; the concept of disturbance, succession and landscape equilibrium; the implications of global climate change.
Offered in fall of even years. IVN based.
 
MEES 616 Fisheries Oceanography (3 credits)
Instructor: E. North
Prerequisite:  at least one of the following: MEES661, AOSC670, MEES621, MEES631, MEES634, MEES682 or permission of instructor.
Course combines the disciplines of physical oceanography, biological oceanography and fisheries science to understand how environmental variability, ecosystems and humans influence harvested fish and shellfish populations. The course explores physical-biological interactions from small-scale processes that influence individual larvae to basin-scale oscillations in climate that shift ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on understanding and using quantitative tools that are fundamental to the discipline with special emphasis on the larval transport model LTRANS.
Offered in spring of even years.  IVN based.

MEES 617 Hydrological Effects of Land Use Change (3 credits)
Instructor: K. Eshleman
Prerequisite: one course in hydrology and one course in statistics or permission of instructor.
Examines the catchment-scale hydrological effects attributable to major land use and land cover alterations, including both anthropic and non-anthropic disturbances. First part of the course will focus on the quantitative measurement and mathematical description of those physical hydrological processes that can be affected by land use and land cover changes. Second part of the course reviews how both deterministic and empirical/statistical models can be applied to analyze and predict observed catchment-scale hydrological and hydrochemical responses to land alterations and disturbances.
Offered in spring of even years. IVN based.
 
 MEES 621 Biological Oceanography (4 credits)
Instructor: Staff
Graduate level survey course covering a wide range of topics which fall under the general heading of biological oceanography. These topics include plankton dynamics and biogeochemical cycles, benthic organisms and processes, and the structure and ecological role of marsh, mangrove and SAV (submerged aquatic vegetation) communities.
Offered in fall. IVN based.

MEES 626 Environmental Geochemistry I (3 credits)
Instructor: J. Schijf
Recommended: physical chemistry
A brief overview of biogeochemical cycles and stresses fundamental aquatic chemistry principles that can be applied to a variety of environmental systems (e.g., freshwater, marine, groundwater, atmospheric). Topics include chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, acids and bases, air-water interactions, precipitation and dissolution, oxidation and reduction, and the solid-solution interface.
Offered in fall. IVN based.

MEES 627 Environmental Geochemistry II (3 credits)
Instructors: K.H. Kilbourne, J. Cornwell
Prerequisite: Environmental Geochemistry I (MEES 626) or permission of instructor
A survey of aquatic geochemical cycles, split evenly between inorganic and organic geochemistry. Topics include global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen, estuarine cycling of organic matter, nutrients and metals, radiochemistry and sediment biogeochemistry/diagenesis.
Offered in spring of odd years. IVN based.

MEES 631 Fisheries Ecology (3 credits)
Instructor: T. Miller, D. Secor
 
Prerequisite: upper level ecology course and introductory statistics
 
Understanding basic ecological processes that affect productivity, abundances and distributions is a prerequisite for effective utilization of Maryland's aquatic resources. This course will explore the forces that select individuals, regulate populations and structure communities.
Offered in spring of even years. IVN based.

MEES 634 Introduction to Bioenergetics and Population Dynamics (3 credits)
Instructors: T. Miller, C. Rowe
Focus on bioenergetic and population dynamic processes at the individual and population levels. Students are introduced to the thermodynamic and bioenergetic principals that underlie patterns of energy partitioning in aquatic animals, following which the course examines the sources and fates of energy that is acquired by individuals and demographic and life history consequences of surplus energy partitioning.
Offered in fall of odd years. IVN based.
 
MEES 637 Zooplankton Ecology (3 credits)
Instructors: J. Pierson, M. Roman, D. Stoecker
Prerequisite: MEES621 or permission of instructor.
The goal of the course is to provide students with a quantitative understanding of zooplankton ecology, including population dynamics, nutrition, behavior, trophic interactions and bio-physical interactions. Emphasis will be placed on critical analysis of zooplankton dynamics from data and in-class discussions of peer-reviewed papers.
Offered in spring of odd years. IVN based.
 
 MEES 640 Introduction to Environmental and Resource Economics (3 credits) - UMES
Instructors: M. Ali, T. Gong, S. Tubene
This course provides an introduction of major topics in the field, such as pollution, climate change, biodiversity, and fisheries. Students will learn basic market theory and the significance of market failures in the environmental context, and will study policy responses to these market failures, both the theory and practice. The goal of this course is to make students aware of the importance of economic arguments in the context of environmental policy discussions.
Offered at the UMES campus.
 
 MEES 641 Fisheries Survey Sampling (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Stevens
This course will train students in methods of estimating abundance, mean size, proportions, and other parameters of fish and wildlife populations. Students will learn theory and techniques for different sampling strategies including random, stratified, systematic, cluster, adaptive, regression and ratio estimators, as well as procedures for estimating variance, confidence intervals, relative error, and sample sizes for each method.
Offered at UMES and on IVN.
 
MEES 642 Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment (4 credits) - UMES
Instructor: P. Chigbu
In this course, the effects of alternative management actions and environmental factors on the abundance and biomass of fish populations will be discussed beginning with an overview of population modeling by reviewing essential mathematical concepts and biostatistics. Then students will be taught the basic fish population characteristics and life histories. Student will learn how to use various mathematical models to estimate population parameters and predict yield under different management scenarios. Topics to be covered include estimation of fish abundance, population growth and mortality rates, stock identification and dynamics and stock recruitment relationships. Other topics are fish production models, catch at age analysis and the problems in fisheries management.
Offered at the UMES campus.
 
MEES 643 Risk and Decision Analysis in Natural Resources Management (3 credits) - UMES
Instructor: M. Ali
This course will enable students to develop skills for managing natural resources with relevant decision frameworks reflecting uncertainty and risk about future events. The decision frameworks involve making tradeoffs across options and time using quantitative methods of risk assessment and decision analysis taking uncertainty into account. The course also considers the types of variability and risks faced by resource managers for several natural resources including forests, waters, wildlife, and fisheries. 
Offered at the UMES campus.
 
MEES 644 Multivariate Statistics (3 credits) - UMES
Instructor: M. Malik
Students will learn various types of multivariate statistical methods including factor analysis, multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. Knowledge from this course will enable students to summarize data and reduce the number of variables necessary to describe the data. The use of multivariate statistics will allow students to analyze complex sets of data from their disciplines, determine if multiple independent variables exist in the data set, and, if the data set contains dependent variables that are correlated with one another.
Offered at UMES campus.

MEES 650 Wetland Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: A. Baldwin
Prerequisite: BIOM 301 or permission of department.
Plant and animal communities, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem properties of wetland systems. Laboratory emphasizes collection and analysis of field data on wetland vegetation, soil, and hydrology.
Offered at UMCP campus.  Fall Odd Years.
 
 MEES 652 Advanced Wetland Creation and Restoration (3 credits) - UMCP
Instructor: A. Baldwin
Prerequisite: one semester of biology or permission of department.
 
Design, construction, and evaluation of wetlands restored or created for ecosystem enhancement or mitigation.  Topics will include ecological restoration theory, goal-setting practices, for establishing wetland hydrology, substrate, and vegetation, and restored ecosystem monitoring and functional assessment. 
Offered at the UMCP campus.

MEES 661 Physics of Estuarine and Marine Environments (3 credits)
Instructor: L. Sanford, W. Boicourt, M. Li, S. Chao
Prerequisite: minimum of one semester each of undergraduate physics and calculus
Graduate-level introduction to physical oceanography, covering a wide range of physical processes in oceans and estuaries. Topics include ocean currents, water mass properties, heat and salt balances, dynamical oceanography, waves, tides, turbulence, sediment transport, estuarine circulation, and continental shelf circulation.
Offered in spring. IVN based.

MEES 670 Conservation Biology (3 credits)
Instructor: K. Gedan
Conservation in the Anthropocene means conserving biodiversity and ecosystem function in the midst of climate change, habitat loss, overexploitation, altered nutrient cycling, and invasive species with protected areas and reserve networks, ecosystem restoration, and other biodiversity conservation and management schemes. 
Offered in fall. IVN based.
 
MEES 671 Remote Sensing for Environmental Management (4 credits) 
Instructor: A. Elmore
Students will develop (1) the tools necessary to carry out remote sensing studies of ecosystem pattern and process, land-use and land-cover change and the impact of climate changes; and (2) a general knowledge of recent research at the interface of remote sensing, ecosystem analysis, global change, and environmental management.
Offered in fall of odd years. IVN based.
 
MEES 681 Advanced Ecological Design
Instructor: S. Lansing
Prerequisite: MATH 220, CHEM 131 and PHYS 121 or equivalent or permission of instructor
An advanced survey course on the field of ecological design including illustration of principles of design with case studies from biologically-based waste treatment systems, ecosystem management and sustainable development. Cross-listed as ENST 481 and ENST 681, credit awarded for only one.

MEES 682 Fisheries Science and Management (3 credits)
Instructor: D. Secor, M. Wilberg
The study of exploited, or potentially exploitable, populations of living aquatic resources, including fish and other organisms. It is applied ecology and, as such, seeks knowledge of how biological interactions and environmental factors influence populations in aquatic ecosystems.
Offered in fall of even years. IVN based.
 
 MEES 688A Scientific Communications (3 credits) - UMES
Instructor: P. Chigbu
This course will address important writing concepts, content, organization, format, and style applied to professional scientific communications such as peer-reviewed manuscripts, science articles and reports for magazines, posters, proposals for funding agencies, theses, and dissertations. Topics such as oral presentations, ethics and research and publications, writing critiques of scientific articles and reports, and preparing cover letters, curriculum vitae, teaching and research statements for positions in academia and industries will also be covered.
 
 MEES 688 Surface Water Quality Modeling (3 credits)
 
Instructor: M. Xia 
This course is an introduction to the theory and application of mass balance-based mathematical models used to simulate the distribution of contaminants in the surface water as a contaminant migrates through the environment. 
Taught at UMES and on IVN.

MEES 698A Aquatic Microbial Ecology (3 credits)
Instructor: A. Santoro
Explores the ecological roles of microorganisms in marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems. Hybrid of a traditional environmental microbiology course - covering microbial growth, physiology and metabolism - and a marine microbiology course - covering microbial contributions to biogeochemistry, aquatic food webs and ecological theory. Topics include diversity and regulation of metabolic processes, the role of microbes in element cycling, microbial food webs, interactions with plants and animals, and phylogenetic and functional diversity. Also covers recent developments in genetic sequencing and analysis as applied to microbial ecosystems. Although emphasis will be placed in estuarine and marine ecosystems, lacustrine and riverine systems will also be discussed.
Offered in spring of even years. IVN based.

MEES 698C Chemical Oceanography (3 credits)
Instructors: L. Lapham, M. Gonsior, A. Heyes, H. Kilbourne, J. Schhijf, L. Cooper
The chemistry of marine waters will be covered and will incorporate an integrated approach together with physical and biological oceanography.  It will provide a modern view and understanding of ocean systems.  Over the course of the semester, we will explore the international of biological, physical and chemical processes that create the oceanic environment that covers more than two thirds of this planet.  Topics include a historical perspective of chemical oceanography, discussions of the major ions in the seawater, key nutrient cycles, the importance of trace elements, organic matter formation and degradation, the chemical volition of the oceans in geologic time. 
This course is meant for graduate students (600 level) and with permission of instructors, advanced undergraduates with chemistry background (400 level).  No pre requites for graduate students, however an undergraduate chemistry background is recommended. 
IVN based. 

MEES 698F Chesapeake Bay Fishes: Identification and Natural History (1 credit)
Instructor: D. Secor
Provides students with experience and knowledge on natural history and identification of Chesapeake Bay fishes, field survey methods, and laboratory techniques in fish demographics and trophic ecology.
Occasional. The course is only offered at CBL.

MEES 698Y Science for Environmental Management (3 credits)
Instructors: W. Dennison, D. Boesch
Provides an overview of the process in which science is applied to various environmental management issues through a diversity of in depth case studies, practitioner perspectives, lectures and projects. Techniques of synthesis and science communication are emphasized through lectures, activities and hands-on exercises. The scientific context for environmental management is developed within historical, societal and geographic contexts. An in depth view of environmental management of the Chesapeake Bay and watershed is used as a recurrent theme throughout the course.
Offered in spring of odd years. IVN based.

MEES 698P Behavioral Ecology of Prairie Dogs (4 Credits)
Instructor: J. Hoogland
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Students participate in a longterm research program that concentrates on the ecology and social behavior of Utah prairie dogs, which are in acute danger of extinction. The study site is in New Mexico. Topics include predation defenses, alarm calling, mating sytems, infanticide, communal nursing, and the avoidance of inbreeding. Four credit hours for students who stay 8 weeks; eight credit hours for students who stay the entire field season.

MEES 698Q Biogeochemistry (3 credits)
Instructor: M. Castro
Biogeochemistry is an interdisciplenary science that focuses on the interactions between ecology and geochemistry. In this course, we use concepts from both ecology and geochemistry to develop a mechanistic understanding of the biogeochemical reactions that occur in and influence the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems.
IVN based.

MEES 698Q Stream Ecology (3 credits)
Instructor: R. Morgan II
Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Ecology of streams, with emphasis on North American and regional stream ecosystems. Fish and invertebrate ecology, restoration ecology, and conservation biology of freshwater species.
Offered in fall of even-numbered years. IVN based.
 
 MEES 708C Mixing and Transport in Coastal Water
Instructor: N. Nidzieko
Prerequisite: 2 semesters of calculus
Recommended: MEES 661
Application of environmental fluid mechanics to problems of pollutant and particle transport and mixing in the coastal environment, including rivers, estuaries and the continental shelf. Mathematical models and theories of advection, diffusion, and dispersion are applied to understand applications of scientific interest in the coastal environment.
Offered in fall. IVN based.
 
MEES 712 Advanced Population Dynamics and Assessment
Instructor: M.Wilberg
Prerequisite: MEES607, BIOM601 or permission of instructor.
Management of exploited populations relies on a quantitative understanding of population dynamics and the effects of exploitation on marine resources. This course focuses on developing students' quantitative and modeling skills, including understanding of population dynamics and responses of populations to exploitation and management actions.  The course covers population models of production, mortality, stock and recruitment, age and growth, and harvesting, and methods for using these models to provide management advice. Additionally, the course focuses on statistical model fitting and simulation.  
Offered in spring of odd years. IVN based.

MEES 721 Plankton Dynamics (3 credits)
Instructors: P. Glibert, M. Roman
Prerequisite: MEES 621
Physiology and ecology of phytoplankton and zooplankton; plankton food-web dynamics; role of plankton in biogeochemical cycles.
Occasional. IVN based.

MEES 743 Aquatic Toxicology (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Mitchelmore
Basic concepts and principles of aquatic toxicology, laboratory testing and field situations, as well as examples of typical data and their interpretation and use by industry and water resources managers will be discussed.  Toxicological action and fate of environmental pollutants will be examined in aquatic ecosystems, whole organisms and at the cellular, biochemical, and molecular levels.
Offered in spring of even years. IVN based.

MOCB 608 Molecular and Cell Biology Seminar (1-2 credits) - UMCP
eminar in molecular and cell biology.

MOCB 639 Advanced Cell Biology (3 credits) - UMCP
ecent activities in key area of modern cell biology.

MOCB 640 Protein Structure and Function (3 credits) - UMCP
Protein structure, properties, and structure-function relationships.

MOCB 708 Advanced Topics in Molecular and Cell Biology (1-4 credits) - UMCP
ectures, experimental courses, and other special instructions in various areas of molecular or cell biology.

NRSC 682 Methods of Plant Science Research (4 credits) - UMCP
The application of biochemical and biophysical methods to problems in biological research with emphasis on plant materials. Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.

NRSC 821 Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: Permission of both department and instructor.
n advanced study of the theory of the chemical methods of soil investigation with emphasis on problems involving application of physical chemistry. 

NRSC 831 Soil Mineralogy (4 credits) - UMCP
Soil minerals, with emphasis on clay minerals, are studied from the viewpoint of soil genesis and physical chemistry. Mineralogical analyses by x-ray and chemical techniques.

NRSC 832 Advanced Soil Physics (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: AGRO 417 and permission of both department and instructor.
An advanced study of physical properties of soils.

PATH 602 Systemic Pathology (4 credits) - UMB
Detailed in this course are disease entities and processes of the following organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, male and female reproductive, endocrine, skin, bone, and nervous. Other topics include neonatal, forensic, and environmental pathology. Instruction is by lecture, laboratory, and computer.
ffered spring semester. 

PATH 603 General Pathology (3 credits) - UMB
Lectures and laboratories are used to present the major subdivisions of general pathology: cellular adaptations, tissue injury and renewal, neoplasia, environmental and nutritional pathology, and pediatric disorders. 
Offered fall semester. 

PBIO 689 Advanced Topics in Plant Biology (1-4 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: permission of department
ectures, experimental courses and other special instructions in various subjects in plant biology.

PBIO 698 Seminar in Plant Biology (1 credit) - UMCP
rerequisite: permission of department
iscussion of special topics and current literature in all phases of botany. 

PBIO 740 Plant Population Biology (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: permission of instructor
n examination of current theoretical and empirical research covering topics such as demography, reproductive strategy, clonality, seed banks, interspecific competition and plant-herbivore interactions.

PHYS 604 Methods of Mathematical Physics (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: advanced calculus and PHYS 410 and PHYS 411 or permission of department
Ordinary and partial differential equations of physics, boundary value problems, Fourier series, Green's functions, complex variables and contour integration. 

PHYS 621 Atmospheric Physics I (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: PHYS 602 and PHYS 605
Composition and structure of the Earth's atmosphere, application of thermodynamics to atmospheric problems, development of the fundamental equations of fluid motion, applications to synoptic scale atmospheric circulations, boundary layer effects, global circulation and other selected topics.

PLSC 400 Environmental Plant Physiology (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: PLSC 100 or PLSC 101 or (BSCI 106 and BSCI 105) Recommended: CHEM 131 and CHEM 132
An introduction to the basic physical and physiological principles necessary for understanding the interactions between plants and their environment. The overall objective is to understand plant responses and adaptations to the environment and the ecological relevance of these responses.

PLSC 420 Principles of Plant Pathology (4 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: CHEM 131, CHEM 132 and PLSC 210 or permission of department
An introduction to the causal agents, nature and management of plant diseases with particular attention paid to economically important diseases of horticultural and agronomic crops. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

PLSC 471 Forest Ecology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: PLSC 201 or BSCI 106
An understanding of the forest ecosystem, its structure and the processes that regulate it are provided. Changes that occur in frosts, the interactions of environment and genetics in promoting ecosystem sustainability, and the role of human influences on urban forest ecosystems.

PLSC 473 Woody Plant Physiology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 422 or PLSC 201 or permission of department
Concentration is placed on physiological processes important to woody plant growth and development. Emphasis will be placed on current concepts and theories of how woody plants grow and develop, and the critical assessment of current research in woody plant physiology. 

PLSC 481 Vegetation Assessment and Analysis (2 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: PLSC 100 or BSCI 106 or permission of instructor  Recommended: PLSC 201, BSCI  360, PLSC 226 or PLSC 471
An overview of vegetation assessment through the collection of data in the field (e.g. plots and transects) and the analysis of existing data and remotely detected images (e.g. aerial photographs and GIS layer).

PLSC 601 Plant Genomics (3 credits) - UMCP
An advanced course in plant genomics which is the study of genes of plant chromosomes. Current topics in gene mapping, molecular markers, QTLs, gene sequencing, and genetic engineering with special focus on agriculturally important traits.

PLSC 685 Advanced Plant Ecophysiology (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: one course in plant physiology
Growth, productivity, and survival are intimately linked to a plant's ability to adjust to its environment. The information provided in this course is designed to provide an introduction to the basic physical and physiological principles necessary for understanding the interactions between plants and their environment. the overall objective of this course is to understand plant responses and adaptations to the environment and the ecological relevance of these responses.

PLSC 783 Molecular Aspects of Plant Environment Interactions (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: BSCI 422
A study of the interactions between abiotic environmental factors and plants. The course will emphasize the molecular aspects of how plants perceive, transduce, and respond to environmental factors.

PLSC 798 Graduate Seminar (1 credit) - UMCP
First and second semester.

PUAF 610 Quantitative Aspects of Policy Analysis (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of department
Introduces statistical methods needed for evaluating and choosing among policy options. Topics include probability, decision-making under uncertainty; the organization, interpretation, and visual display of complex data; prediction and inferences about causality; hypothesis testing; and linear and multiple regression. Develops analytical skills and the ability to apply theory to complex, real-world problems. 

PUAF 711 Public Management and Leadership (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of department
Reviews the managerial, political, and ethical problems faced by public sector managers and leaders, including setting an organization's goals, obtaining and protecting a program mandate, designing a service delivery system, implementing a new program.

PUAF 740 Public Policy and the Environment (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of department
Surveys of major federal environmental legislation; the development and implementation of laws, and alternative ways of thinking about the relationship between humans and the environment. 

UAF 741 Global Environmental Problems (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: permission of department
uitability of analytic tools for examining global environmental problems, human overpopulation, land abuse, ozone depletion, climate change, acid rain, loss of biological diversity, the scarcity of food, fresh water, energy and non fuel mineral resources, and health hazards of pollutants, toxic metals and radiation.

PUAF 742 Environmental Ethics (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of department
Analyzes issues such as the relation between human beings and nature from the perspectives of the science, history, philosophy, and religion. Considers the bases for policies such as environmental regulation, public lands, and international conventions with respect to the environment. 

PUAF 743 Ecological Economics (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: permission of department
Course is based upon the text Valuing the Earth: Economics, Ecology, and Ethics. 

UAF 745 Human Health and Environmental Policy (3 credits) - UMCP
Reviews the major human physiological systems and their integrated toxicological functions; considers key bodily defenses; and discusses classic, emerging, and ambiguous risks; in all ecological context. Applies to scientific controversy, the methods of policy formation, such as risk analysis, social-cost analysis, "outcomes" analysis, and decision analysis, all in political-economic context.


STAT 400 Applied Probability and Statistics I (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in MATH 131 or MATH 141 or permission of department
Random variables, standard distributions, moments, law of large numbers and central limit theorem. Sampling methods, estimation of parameters, testing of hypotheses. 

STAT 401 Applied Probability and Statistics II (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: STAT 400
oint estimation - unbiased and consistent estimators. Interval estimation. Minimum variance and maximum likelihood estimators. Testing of hypotheses. Regression, correlation and analysis of variance. Sampling distributions. Elements of non-parametric methods.

TAT 420 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: SURV 410 or STAT 401
oint estimation, sufficiency, completeness. Cramer-Rao inequality, maximum likelihood. Confidence intervals for parameters of normal distribution. Hypothesis testing, most powerful tests, likelihood ration tests. Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, regression, correlation. Nonparametric methods.

STAT 440 Sampling Theory (3 credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: STAT 401 or STAT 420
imple random sampling. Sampling for proportions. Estimation of sample size. Sampling with varying probabilities. Sampling: stratified, systematic, cluster, double, sequential, incomplete. 

STAT 464 Introduction to Biostatistics (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: one semester of calculus
Probabilistic models. Sampling. Some applications of probability in genetics. Experimental designs. Estimation of effects of treatments. Comparative experiments. Fisher-Irwin test. Wilcoxon tests for paired comparisons. 

STAT 600 Probability Theory I (3credits) - UMCP
rerequisite: STAT 410
robability space; distribution functions and densities; Poisson limit theorem; de Moivre-Laplace theorem; measure-theoretic definition of expectation; classification of measures on R; convergence of random variables; Radon-Nikodym theorem; LP spaces; conditional probabilities; independence of events, sigma-algebras and random variables; Bayes; theorem; pi-systems and Dynkin systems; discrete Markov chains; random walks; gambler's ruin problem; Markov chains on a general phase space; Borel-cantelli lemmas; Kolmogorov inequality; three series theorem; laws of large number.

STAT 601 Probability Theory II (3 credits) - UMCP
Prerequisite: STAT 600
Weak convergence of measure; characteristic functions: Central limit theorem and local limit theorem; stable laws; Kolmogorov consistency theorem (without proof); conditional expectation and martingales; Brownian motion; Markov processes and families; stochastic integral and ito formula. 

STAT 601 Applied Statistics I (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: STAT 453 or consent of instructor
Theory and application of the linear regression model, least squares estimation, model building, influence diagnostics, multi-collinearity and graphical analysis of residuals, nonlinear regression, logistic regression. Data analysis using statistical packages and other topics as time permits.

STAT 602 Applied Statistics II (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: STAT 453 or consent of instructor
Principles of experimental design, the analysis of variance and covariance, randomized designs, Latin share designs, incomplete block designs, factorial designs, confounding and fractional replication, split-plot designs and use of statistical packages.

STAT 605 Survey Sampling (3 credits) - UMBC
Prerequisite: STAT 453 or consent of instructor
Sampling versus total enumeration, planning of a survey sampling, statistical sampling methods and their analysis, simple random sampling, stratified sampling, systematic sampling, cluster sampling, and double and multi-stage sampling, problem of non-response and variance estimation, and practical case study.

STAT 614 Environmental Statistics  - UMBC
Prerequisite STAT453/653 or consent of instructor
Graduate-level introduction to statistical methods used in environmental applications. The following will be emphasized throughout the course: non-parametric methods using environmental data,; methods of analyzing data that are below the limit of detection; sampling designs, including stratified sampling, composite sampling and ranked set sampling; sampling to determine hot spots; trend estimation methods for uncorrelated, correlated and seasonal data; discussion of some basic ideas from spatial statistics; and environmental data analysis using statistical software.

 

 

TOXI 601 and 602 Advanced Toxicology (3 credits each) - UMB
Prerequisite: 300-level or higher biochemistry and physiology or permission of instructor
Lectures and discussions cover principles of toxicology. Topics include major classes of toxic a gens, principal target organs of toxicity, and mechanisms of toxicity. Two-semester course.

TOXI 609 Methods in Toxicology (1 - 3 credits) - UMB
 
Prerequisite: permission required.
Students become familiar with laboratory methods used by staff members to study the effects of toxins and environmental pollutants on living systems.
Offered at the UMB and UMCP campuses.
 
 TOXI 621 Risk Assessment and Management in a Regulatory Context ( 3 credits) - UMB
This course is designed to teach students the basic principles that apply to risk assessment of the environmental and human health effects of hazardous chemicals. The course features both lectures and case studies to introduce students to environmental regulations that impact the use, environmental release and clean up of chemical contaminants. Students will learn how to evaluate relationships between exposure to chemicals and health outcomes and how regulations are developed to protect human health..

TOXI 625 Principles of Aquatic Toxicology (3 credits) - UMES
Prerequisite:  TOXI 601 or equivalent
This course covers toxicology testing methods, chemical disposition in aquatic species, metabolism, and biochemical effects at the subcellular level. Consideration will be given to the effects and mechanisms by which chemicals produce toxic effects in aquatic organisms.
Spring semester.
 
TOXI 688B Advanced Toxicology (3 credits) - UMES
 
Instructor: A. Elnabawi
 
TOXI 688F Pathology of Toxic Compound (3 credits) - UMES

Instructor: E. May
 
TOXI 688 Methods in Toxicology (1 - 3 credits) - UMES
Students become familiar with laboratory methods used by faculty members to study the effect of toxins and environmental pollutants on living systems.